#32 - An Imperfect Match

Thursday, July 31, 2014

This week, dating site OK Cupid put up a blog post describing experiments it conducted on its users. In one experiment, the site told users who were bad matches for one another that they were actually good matches, and vice versa. Alex and PJ talk to OK Cupid President and co-founder Christian Rudder about the ubiquity of online user experimentation and his defense of potentially sending OK Cupid's users on bad dates.

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eBay is a Beautiful Place, Sometimes

Thursday, July 31, 2014

If you don’t use eBay regularly, you may think it’s a strange world where strange people buy strange things. You’re absolutely right, but sometimes those things are beautiful gems.

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#AskCostolo and Twitter's Abuse Problem

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Twitter's CEO did an interview. If you followed it on Twitter, it didn't go great. 

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The NYPD is Taking Twitter Classes

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

New York Police officers are being taught how to use common sense on social media. 

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A Novel About Working On My Novel

Monday, July 28, 2014

Cory Arcangel is an artist whose work often deals with the way we interact with technology. His latest project is a book comprised entirely of people tweeting about how they're working on their novels. You will be not at all surprised to learn that it is called Working On My Novel.

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The Wall Street Journal and Vice Were Hacked

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

A Russian hacker accessed the WSJ and Vice websites.

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Someone at the EPA Really Likes Kim Kardashian's New iPhone Game

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Late last night, the official Twitter account for the Environmental Protection Authority accidentally tweeted an excited proclamation about their success in the Kim Kardashian's new mobile game, which invites you to "create your own celebrity and rise to fame and fortune!" 

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Ja Rule is Here to Help

Monday, July 21, 2014

A new site promises to provide you with the perfect Ja Rule song for any moment. 

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You Can Watch The Private Sector Edit Wikipedia Too

Monday, July 21, 2014

We're still waiting for an @TLDRedits account to appear. 

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#31 - Race Swap

Thursday, July 17, 2014

What happened when a black woman writer went online disguised as a white man? She got a lot fewer death threats, for one thing.

 

 

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Scholars Ask For Facebook's "Emotional Contagion" Study to Be Withdrawn

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Last month, Facebook announced that it had conducted an experiment in which it purposely showed a group of users only negative posts from their friends' news feeds. The premise was to test what the academics behind the research of "emotional contagion," the notion that moods can spread across networks. Well, everyone was annoyed at being manipulated, and the lead researcher in the study has apologized. The Electronic Privacy Information Center has asked for an investigation from the FTC, saying Facebook was duplicitous, manipulative, and failed to inform users of the experiment. Now, Maryland Law Professor (and friend of TLDR) James Grimmelmann, along with colleague Leslie Meltzer Henry and the faculty of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University have asked the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences to retract the Facebook study.

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Google Plus Dropped Its Real Name Policy

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Three years after launch, Google Plus users can use (almost) whatever fake name they want.

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Online Agitprop! Everyone's Doing It!

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

On the most recent TLDR, I spoke to Max Seddon, foreign correspondent for Buzzfeed, about some recently unearthed documents that show a massive online pro-Russia propaganda effort with ties to The Kremlin

In that interview, Max made it clear that Russia is far from the only government that does this sort of opinion influencing, citing an AP report from a couple months ago about US efforts to sway public opinion in Cuba by creating its own "fake twitter." from the interview:

USAID set up an entire fake social network for cuban people to get around all the internet filters to Cuba that was meant to create some sort of thing that they could use to influence popular opinion in Cuba, which is closed off to the US, and it's very difficult to do well. because On the internet, people are smart, it's very easy to compare things, and use multiple sources of information and come to the right conclusions. They can tell when something is fake.

On Monday, Glenn Greenwald's The Intercept produced another example of this governmental internet meddling, this time from Britain's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). 

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What Can We Learn About the Internet From the Disastrous DashCon Convention Last Weekend?

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

What can we learn from Tumblr's disastrous DashCon fan convention last weekend?

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Where the Internet Goes to Be Lonely

Monday, July 14, 2014

A decade ago, a Google search for "I am lonely" took people to a conversation thread on an obscure digital video discussion board. Now it's a 2,200-page repository of the Internet's thoughts on loneliness.

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On Passwords and Fearlessness and the Future

Monday, July 14, 2014

Today, Wall Street Journal technology columnist Christopher Mims boldly declared that the password is irrelevant and dying. How boldly, you probably weren't asking yourself? Well, so boldly that he posted his twitter password in the article.

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You Can Watch Congress Edit Wikipedia

Friday, July 11, 2014

A number of Twitter bots are monitoring Wikipedia edits made from national legislatures around the world. 

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