Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Fake Online Reviews By Real Fans

Friday, September 27, 2013

This week, the New York Attorney General’s office announced that nineteen companies would be fined $350,000 for paying for fake reviews on sites like Yelp. But a study that came out earlier this year says that many fake online reviews, including the most negative ones, are often written by a brand's biggest fans. Bob talks to Duncan Simester, one of the authors of the study and a professor at MIT, about why a brand's fans would leave it bad reviews.

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Battling Messages on Obamacare

Friday, September 27, 2013

The next phase of the Affordable Care Act goes into effect next week with the opening of new health insurance exchanges. Brooke and Bob take a look at the messaging war, from the conservative ads advising people to "opt out," to the Obama administration's push to educate people about the new law, and the media's role in covering this protracted battle.

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Which committee is responsible for providing oversight at our borders?

Friday, September 27, 2013

Bob reads listener responses to producer Sarah Abdurrhaman’s piece“My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents.”  Brooke talks to former congressman Lee H. Hamilton, co-author of a recent report calling for reform of the Department of Homeland Security, about how the DHS can, and should, work better.

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Jimmy Kimmel's Viral Video Gag

Friday, September 13, 2013

This week, Jimmy Kimmel revealed that he had faked a viral video that has racked up over 12 million views. Producers and hosts of TLDR, PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman have been arguing all week about whether this falsehood represents some kind of betrayal of its viewers. So they decided to hash the argument out on the air.

Los Lobos - La Iguana

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Warrantless Device Searches at US Borders

Friday, September 13, 2013

There has long been a quiet exception to the constitutional protection against warrantless search and seizure. It happens routinely at every US border, where federal agents are free to confiscate--and copy--contents of hard drives, cell phones, and other electronic data. Bob talks to New York Times contributor Susan Stellin, who broke a story this week with new insights into how the US government exploits the loophole to target journalists, activists and who knows who else.

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The Ever Changing Syria Story

Friday, September 13, 2013

The conversation about American strikes in Syria shifted this week, after Bashar Al-Assad suggested he would surrender his chemical weapons, and President Obama called on Congress to delay a decision on missile strikes. Bob takes a look at this week's Syria developments in the media, including the supposed gaffe by Secretary of State John Kerry that may have allowed the US to avoid going to war.

Andrew Bird - Ophelia Looks Back

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The Strange Case of Barrett Brown

Friday, September 13, 2013

Barrett Brown is a journalist and activist who has been in jail for a year awaiting trial on a number of charges - chief among them copying and pasting a link to leaked documents into an IRC chat room. Ed Pilkington of The Guardian talks to Bob about Brown's case, and the implications it has for other journalists.

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Huffington Post Disables Anonymous Comments

Friday, September 13, 2013

This week, The Huffington Post ended anonymous comments on its website in the hopes of engendering more civil discussions. Bob reflects on OTM's own issues with anonymous commenters, and speaks with Arianna Huffington about her site's new requirement to name names.

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Iraq Coverage VS. Syria Coverage

Friday, September 06, 2013

Coverage of the proposed military intervention in Syria is attracting inevitable comparisons to the run-up to the Iraq war, which began 10 years ago. But this time around, with Iraq still fresh in the country's collective memory, the media seem to be more careful. Bob speaks to Max Fisher, foreign affairs blogger for the Washington Post, about the media's coverage of Syria, and how the inevitable comparison to Iraq may not be that useful.

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This Town

Friday, September 06, 2013

In his new book This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral—plus plenty of valet parking!—in America's Gilded Capital, Mark Leibovich provides a panoramic view of the ugly behavior Washington elites—journalists, politicians, and lobbyists—engage in. Bob talks to Leibovich about all the sordid details of "This Town."

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The Collaboration

Friday, September 06, 2013

In the 1930's, Hollywood studios agreed to censor and sometimes cancel films in order to remain active in Nazi Germany. Bob talks to Ben Urwand, author of The Collaboration: Hollywood's Pact With Hitler about this oft-forgotten chapter of American history.

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Satirists and Syria

Friday, September 06, 2013

On the Media's own PJ Vogt wrote a story for our new blog TLDR about the difficulty outlets like The Onion and The Daily Show are having finding humor in the situation in Syria as it becomes more complex. Bob talks to PJ about what the outlets are doing wrong, and how they can improve.

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The Retro Report

Friday, September 06, 2013

Beginning its second season this week, The Retro Report is a video series that looks at reporting from the past to re-examine its accuracy, and follow up on what happened after the media moved on. Bob talks to Retro Report publisher Taegan Goddard about the stories the Retro Report has looked back on.

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How Will Journalism Keep The Lights On?

Friday, August 30, 2013

As audiences for media splinter and advertising with it, how will the journalism concerns that we've grown to know and love keep the lights on? Bob talks to Alan Rusbridger of the Guardian, Mike Perlis of Forbes, M. Scott Havens of The Atlantic, Erin Pettigrew of Gawker, Evan Smith of The Texas Tribune, Richard Toffel of ProPublica and Pam Horan of the Online Publishers Association about all the ways they're striving mightily to keep journalism financially viable.  

 

John Lennon - Imagine (Instrumental)

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The State of Streaming Music

Friday, August 30, 2013

After years of hemorrhaging money from piracy, the music industry placed its faith in online subscription services like Spotify and Pandora. But a decade on, streaming music appears to be a triumph of hope over experience. Tim Carmody, senior writer for The Verge, says that streaming services and the music industry are clinging to the belief that profitability is ... just over the next hill.

 

Vitamin String Quartet - Champagne Supernova

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ESPN's Big Bet

Friday, August 16, 2013

As the internet economy emerged, many companies zeroed in on niche groups of consumers to stay in business. ESPN, however, made big money bets on huge sports. Bob talks with the Atlantic's Derek Thompson about how that bet paid off handsomely and about Fox Sports 1 - a new competitor in the cable sports market. 

The Who - Baba O'Riley

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The Stories They Carried

Friday, August 16, 2013

The Federal Writers' Project put thousands of people to work including Zora Neale Hurston, Stetson Kennedy, and John Steinbeck. They recorded oral histories, folkways, music and wrote everything from state guides to children's books. In an interview that originally aired in 2008, Bob speaks to Jerrold Hirsch, author of Portrait of America, who describes the legacy of "introducing America to Americans," and how the program upended the American story.

Lunasa - Killarney Boys of Pleasure

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NPR's Ombudsman Deconstructs an NPR Report

Friday, August 16, 2013

Two years ago, NPR aired a heartbreaking series on government failures in child welfare on South Dakota Indian reservations. Earlier this month, NPR Ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos released a comprehensive report on the series, saying that it was deeply flawed and should not have aired. Bob looks at the series and Schumacher-Matos' response.

Clint Mansell - Cruel Mistress

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Like A Funeral

Friday, August 09, 2013

Bob speaks with Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi about the scene at the Post when Post CEO and Chairman Don Graham announced the paper's sale to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Farhi had a unique perspective on the sale as the only reporter who knew the announcement was coming. Farhi also lays out the legacy of the Graham family. 

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The Forgotten Network

Friday, August 09, 2013

Television viewers under a certain age think of the big three broadcast networks as having existed since the dawn of time. A misconception, of course - but largely because of what it omits. In TV's earliest days, there was also the DuMont Network, a pioneering enterprise that aired some of its era's most popular programs. Bob talks history with David Weinstein, author of book that chronicles the rise and fall of DuMont.

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