Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Interview with David Sassoon, Founder of Pulitzer Prize Winning Environmental News Organization

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

In July of 2010, a catastrophic oil spill took place in Marshall, Michigan, flooding a million gallons of oil into the Kalamazoo river. At the time, the media paid it little attention, distracted perhaps by the more dramatic Deepwater Horizon oil disaster that was just winding down in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Letters

Friday, April 26, 2013

Bob reads from a few of your letters and comments.

 

Jim James - All Is Forgiven

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Hey Everybody, Let's Fix Twitter

Friday, April 26, 2013

Twitter: we all love it, but during recent breaking news stories, it's been an amplifier for rumors. Bob talks to OTM producer PJ Vogt about how Twitter could be better, and asks listeners for their suggestions. 

Head over to our blog with your suggestions

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The Kill Team

Friday, April 26, 2013

In a new documentary, The Kill Team, director Dan Krauss tells the story of the group of US soldiers convicted of murdering unarmed Afghan civilians. The documentary looks at the roles played by not one, but two soldier-whistleblowers. Krauss talks to Bob about the moral ambiguities of the story and the difficulty of doing the right thing in a war zone.

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Framing the Boston Bombing

Friday, April 26, 2013

The Boston bombing has become a Rorschach blot for the media, who have tied it to everything from immigration to welfare to national security. Bob talks to The Daily Beast's Peter Beinart about the media and the culture's desire to impose meaning on tragedy.

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The Future of Surveillance

Friday, April 26, 2013

Surveillance camera images of Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev catalyzed not only the manhunt which caught them, but calls for more surveillance cameras around the country. It’s worth remembering that, right now, video surveillance is a blunt tool. Bob speaks with Christoph Bregler, an NYU computer science professor, about the ways that surveillance will soon be much more effective.

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Inspire, Al Qaeda's Magazine, and the Tsarnaev Brothers

Friday, April 26, 2013

This week Dzhokhar Tsarnaev told law enforcement agents that he and his brother learned how to make their homemade bombs from Inspire, the English-language magazine of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Bob talks to JM Berger about the magazine, which has gone from being a late-night punchline to something much more terrifying.

 

Kelan Philip Cohran & The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble - Spin

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Twitter Coverage Through The Night

Friday, April 19, 2013

As a manhunt for the Boston bombing suspects unfolded in the wee hours of Friday morning, Twitter was the place to be for coverage. Brooke speaks with OTM producer Alex Goldman, who captained the late (really late) night Twitter coverage for On the Media.

 

Implode - Bottom Of A Well

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Reporting Global Health Epidemics In A Wired World

Friday, April 12, 2013

In China, a new form of avian flu, called H7N9, has killed 10 people and infected an additional 28.  China’s gotten plaudits from the global health community for its transparency and responsiveness to this outbreak. But that's partly because many remember how China lied about SARS in 2002, a decision that killed hundreds. Public health reporter Maryn McKenna talks to Bob about what the standards are for reporting health epidemics in a wired world. 

 

Bonobo - Cirrus

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Why We Might be Telling the Wrong Stories in the Gun Debate

Friday, April 12, 2013

As the Senate debates gun control for the first time in decades, we’re awash in stories we might never have heard but for Newtown. Brooke speaks with New York Times op-ed writer Joe Nocera, who's tracking gun violence daily on his blog The Gun Report. And Bob speaks with reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg about why we're stuck with anecdotes instead of data in the gun discussion.

 

Lúnasa - Killarney Boys Of Pleasure

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The Bitcoin Bubble

Friday, April 05, 2013

Bitcoin is an online currency backed by no government, central authority or bank. Invented in 2009 as a response to the global financial crisis it's now worth over a billion dollars. Reuters financial blogger Felix Salmon talks to Bob about Bitcoin's impact on the real world and how every conversation about Bitcoin is making it a little bit stronger.

 

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Somalia's Child Journalists

Friday, April 05, 2013

In Somalia the relative calm and stability of the last few years has resulted in a burgeoning journalism scene. But the practice is a deadly one, journalists are targeted for offending powerful interests, and most experienced journalists have fled. NPR's East Africa correspondent, Gregory Warner, talks to Bob about who's stepped in to do the incredibly risky reporting in Somalia - children.

 

Kronos Quartet - Mai Nozipo

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Saying Goodbye to "Illegal Immigrants"

Friday, April 05, 2013

On Tuesday the Associated Press eliminated the phrases "illegal immigrantand "undocumented" from its stylebook. Previous OTM guest Jose Antonio Vargas has been campaigning for this change for months on the grounds that “actions are illegal – not people.” The AP has conceded this point of view, but it’s not because of political correctness. Bob talks to AP editor Tom Kent, who explains that the change is part of a broader overhaul of the AP stylebook.

 

William Tyler - We Can't Go Home Again

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Do Supreme Court Rulings Reflect the Culture, or Change it?

Friday, March 29, 2013

The question of same-sex marriage landed in the Supreme Court this past week, and marriage equality supporters are hoping for a landmark ruling that will legalize same-sex marriage. If it happens, it’ll be one in a series of history-making Supreme Court rulings. But how does it work? Does the Supreme Court have the power to change the culture, or does our culture influence the decisions of the justices? NYU law professor Barry Friedman has written a book on that very question. He tells Bob that for the most part, the Supreme Court tries to shape their decisions according to what the public wants. 

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The Legacy of a Filibuster

Friday, March 29, 2013

In early March, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul used a 13-hour filibuster to draw attention to the Obama Administration's drone programs. This week, Slate's David Weigel noticed that public opinion about drones has changed significantly since that filibuster. Bob spoke with Weigel about the connection.

Errors - Tusk

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Remembering Anthony Lewis

Friday, March 29, 2013

Anthony Lewis passed away this week at 85 after a long and storied career covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times. In a segment originally aired in 2008, Brooke spoke with Lewis about his book Freedom for the Thought We Hate, an examination of the First Amendment. He explained that the amendment that governs free speech and the press might not be as familiar as we think.

 

Oddisee - Frostbite

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Microsoft and the Global Network Initiative

Friday, March 22, 2013

China's surveillance of Skype is not particularly surprising. What is surprising is that Skype owner Microsoft is a founding member of the Global Network Initiative, an anti-internet censorship and pro-privacy organization. Bob speaks to Ethan Zuckerman, director of MIT's Center for Civic Media, about the Global Network Initiative and its apparent shortcomings.

 

Four Tet - Pinnacles

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Cracking Chinese Skype's Surveillance Code

Friday, March 22, 2013

We have known for years that certain words and phrases can get Chinese internet users flagged for surveillance by the Chinese government. Now a computer science graduate student at the University of New Mexico has compiled an extensive list of the sometimes surprising words and phrases that put Chinese internet censors on alert. Bob talks to Jeffrey Knockel about how he cracked the code of the Chinese version of Skype to compile the list.

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The State of the News Media

Friday, March 22, 2013

This week, the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism released its annual “State of the News Media” report, detailing the health, or in this case the frailty, of mainstream US media online and off. The report contained a litany of grim statistics about the consumption and economics of news. Bob talks to Pew Associate Director Mark Jurkowitz, who says the situation isn’t is bleak as it could be.


Beastie Boys - Multilateral Nuclear Disarmament

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Infamous Internet Troll "Weev" Goes to Jail

Friday, March 22, 2013

Infamous internet troll Andrew “weev” Auernheimer was sentenced to three and a half years in prison this week. He was prosecuted under the controversial Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which critics call too stringent and punitive. Bob talks to Gawker writer Adrian Chen about whether Weev's prosecution will undermine attempts to reform the CFAA. 

 

Plan B - Ill Manors

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