Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Microsoft and the Global Network Initiative

Friday, March 22, 2013

China's surveillance of Skype is not particularly surprising. What is surprising is that Skype owner Microsoft is a founding member of the Global Network Initiative, an anti-internet censorship and pro-privacy organization. Bob speaks to Ethan Zuckerman, director of MIT's Center for Civic Media, about the Global Network Initiative and its apparent shortcomings.

 

Four Tet - Pinnacles

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The Identity of Minors

Friday, March 22, 2013

Even as the media and public fitfully reckoned with the Steubenville verdict, a similar case is playing out in Torrington, Connecticut. Like Steubenville case, a lot of bullying and ridicule of the victims has taken place on social media. Unlike the Steubenville case, the local paper, the Connecticut Register Citizen, chose to publish the bullying tweets from high school students, with their twitter handles and images unredacted. The editor of the newspaper, Matt DeRienzo talks to Bob about his decision to print that information

 

Four Tet - 0181-01

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Cracking Chinese Skype's Surveillance Code

Friday, March 22, 2013

We have known for years that certain words and phrases can get Chinese internet users flagged for surveillance by the Chinese government. Now a computer science graduate student at the University of New Mexico has compiled an extensive list of the sometimes surprising words and phrases that put Chinese internet censors on alert. Bob talks to Jeffrey Knockel about how he cracked the code of the Chinese version of Skype to compile the list.

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How Personal Finance Led Us Astray

Friday, March 22, 2013

For over 20 years a voracious personal finance industry has tried to help us make smarter investments and sound financial choices. And it's created a number of stars in the process, television personalities and best-selling authors.

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3D Printing

Friday, March 08, 2013

Desktop 3D printing has the potential to change our understanding of the 'ownership' of objects. Rather than buying many of the things we get at stores, 3D printing will allow you to make them at home. Bob talks with Chris Anderson, CEO of 3D Robotics and author of Makers: The New Industrial Revolution, who says the potential of this burgeoning technology is enormous. 

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Don't Screw It Up

Friday, March 08, 2013

Following up on his conversation with Chris Anderson, Bob speaks with Michael Weinberg, Vice President at Public Knowledge, who's working to explain the benefits of 3D printing to legislators before regulation takes hold.

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Fan Fiction and the Law

Friday, March 08, 2013

The internet has supercharged the world of fan fiction - stories written by fans based on their favorite works. Bob talks to Rebecca Tushnet, head of the legal committee at the Organization for Transformative Works, about the collision of fan fiction and fair use.

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DNA Samples and Privacy

Friday, March 01, 2013

In over half of U.S. states and on the federal level law enforcement, after arresting you but before you’ve been convicted of any crime, can take a DNA sample from you. This week the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments about whether this kind of search violates 4th Amendment protections and is constitutional.  Bob speaks with New York Times reporter Adam Liptak about the what this kind of DNA samples mean for personal privacy.  

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Frustration in the White House Press Corps

Friday, March 01, 2013

Frustration is growing in the White House press corps because of limited access to the "transparency" president. Bob goes to the White House to find out how the role of the press corps is changing under this media savvy administration.

 

Anika - Officer Officer

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Predicting Oscar Winners

Friday, February 22, 2013

The prediction models used to forecast the outcome of the 2012 presidential elections are now being used on another major event: the Academy Awards. Bob speaks with Microsoft researcher David Rothschild about his predictions for the 2013 Oscars.

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The Man With A Movie Camera

Friday, February 22, 2013

The practice of itinerant filmmaking - traveling from town to town, charging a fee for residents to become the stars of a film - mostly died out in the early 50's. But one man continued the practice for nearly 40 years, filming the same movie over and over again. Bob talks to Caroline Frick, Executive Director of the The Texas Archive of the Moving Image about her decade-long fixation on filmmaker Melton Barker and his oft-filmed movie The Kidnapper's Foil. 

 

You can watch several versions of The Kidnapper's Foil at meltonbarker.org

 

The Hut Sut Song - from The Kidnapper's Foil

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Why the Press Can't Play Referee, and Why they Should

Friday, February 22, 2013

The Atlantic’s James Fallows believes that the failures we’re seeing in the sequestration coverage suggest a larger problem with our political system and the press that’s supposed to cover it. Fallows tells Bob that our press isn't comfortable playing referee, but they might need to start.

 

Hauschka - Radar

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Inside the Vatican

Friday, February 22, 2013

Pope Benedict’s sudden resignation last week has prompted speculation on two fronts: why he is resigning, and who will be selected as Pope in the upcoming Vatican conclave. Reporters from all over will travel to Rome for the event, including blogger Rocco Palmo. Bob talks to Palmo about covering the church’s inner politics from Philadelphia, and the one bankable trait of the next Pope.

 

Breton - The Commission

Anatomy of a Mistake

Friday, February 15, 2013

An article published by the Washington Post reported that the government wants to create public super WiFi networks that could potentially replace the ISPs most people use now. The piece was linked and posted all over the internet, but there was one tiny problem: it was wrong. Bob talks to Ars Technica writer Jon Brodkin about the inaccuracies in the reporting and what the FCC’s proposal might actually mean.  

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Lawrence Weschler on the Fiction of Non-Fiction

Friday, February 15, 2013

Joseph Mitchell and Ryszard Kapuscinski created some of the most celebrated narrative non-fiction of this century; full of indelible characters, scenes, and dialogue. But both have been dogged by accusations that they doctored dialogue, manufactured scenes and created composite characters. In an interview that originally aired in December 2010, Bob talks with celebrated narrative non-fiction writer Lawrence Weschler about great writers and questionable facts. 

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The FBI's "Hatching and Financing" of Terrorist Plots

Friday, February 01, 2013

Since 9/11, the FBI has stepped up its reliance on sting operations to catch potential terrorists before they strike. But in the process, says journalist Trevor Aaronson, the agency has ended up "hatching and financing more terrorist plots in the United States than any other group." Bob talks with Aaronson about his new book, The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Manufactured War on Terrorism

 

Binky Griptite & The Mellowmatics - You're Gonna Cry

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They Might Be Pirates: Who Is Really Sharing Digital Media

Friday, February 01, 2013

A newly-released study from Columbia University gives the most comprehensive picture to date of digital media pirates. Bob talks with one of the study’s authors, Joe Karaganis, about what the findings mean for online copyright infringement and why the failure of a six strikes policy is only a matter of time.  

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Facebook's New Social Search

Friday, January 25, 2013

Facebook has introduced a new search tool called social graph search, which lets users search across the Facebook database by users' interests. Privacy advocates aren't pleased with the new feature, arguing that it makes information about users too easy to find. Bob talks to Tom Scott, who has been given early access to the feature and has been publicizing some of his searches. 

Four Tet - 0181

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Barely Any U.S. Culture will Enter the Public Domain this Year

Friday, January 25, 2013

Copyright protections were never supposed to last forever. Copyright was originally designed to protect creators long enough so that they could profit from their work, after which time that work would enter the public domain. However, changes to copyright law have made it so that copyright protections in the US generally last for 70 years after the creator's death. Duke Law School Professor James Boyle runs the Center for the Study of the Public Domain. He tells Bob about all the works that would have entered the public domain this year, but didn't. 

Dan Auerbach - Heartbroken, In Disrepair

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Tweet That Your Boss is an A**hole, and Get Away With It

Friday, January 25, 2013

Since 1935, the National Labor Relations Act has protected the right of private-sector employees to discuss workplace conditions. But as conversations shift from the break room to the sphere of social media, regulators are facing new challenges in distinguishing protected speech from "mere griping." Bob talks with Lafe Solomon, General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, about what can and can't be tweeted about the workplace.

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