Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Lawrence Weschler on the Fiction of Non-Fiction

Friday, February 15, 2013

Joseph Mitchell and Ryszard Kapuscinski created some of the most celebrated narrative non-fiction of this century; full of indelible characters, scenes, and dialogue. But both have been dogged by accusations that they doctored dialogue, manufactured scenes and created composite characters. In an interview that originally aired in December 2010, Bob talks with celebrated narrative non-fiction writer Lawrence Weschler about great writers and questionable facts. 

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They Might Be Pirates: Who Is Really Sharing Digital Media

Friday, February 01, 2013

A newly-released study from Columbia University gives the most comprehensive picture to date of digital media pirates. Bob talks with one of the study’s authors, Joe Karaganis, about what the findings mean for online copyright infringement and why the failure of a six strikes policy is only a matter of time.  

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The FBI's "Hatching and Financing" of Terrorist Plots

Friday, February 01, 2013

Since 9/11, the FBI has stepped up its reliance on sting operations to catch potential terrorists before they strike. But in the process, says journalist Trevor Aaronson, the agency has ended up "hatching and financing more terrorist plots in the United States than any other group." Bob talks with Aaronson about his new book, The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Manufactured War on Terrorism

 

Binky Griptite & The Mellowmatics - You're Gonna Cry

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Tweet That Your Boss is an A**hole, and Get Away With It

Friday, January 25, 2013

Since 1935, the National Labor Relations Act has protected the right of private-sector employees to discuss workplace conditions. But as conversations shift from the break room to the sphere of social media, regulators are facing new challenges in distinguishing protected speech from "mere griping." Bob talks with Lafe Solomon, General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, about what can and can't be tweeted about the workplace.

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Facebook's New Social Search

Friday, January 25, 2013

Facebook has introduced a new search tool called social graph search, which lets users search across the Facebook database by users' interests. Privacy advocates aren't pleased with the new feature, arguing that it makes information about users too easy to find. Bob talks to Tom Scott, who has been given early access to the feature and has been publicizing some of his searches. 

Four Tet - 0181

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Barely Any U.S. Culture will Enter the Public Domain this Year

Friday, January 25, 2013

Copyright protections were never supposed to last forever. Copyright was originally designed to protect creators long enough so that they could profit from their work, after which time that work would enter the public domain. However, changes to copyright law have made it so that copyright protections in the US generally last for 70 years after the creator's death. Duke Law School Professor James Boyle runs the Center for the Study of the Public Domain. He tells Bob about all the works that would have entered the public domain this year, but didn't. 

Dan Auerbach - Heartbroken, In Disrepair

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Blurring the Line Between Advertising and Content

Friday, January 25, 2013

Last week, The Atlantic ran a piece of sponsored content on its website for the Church of Scientology that looked a lot like their standard editorial content. Within 12 hours, the magazine had pulled the article and apologized. Bob talks to digital media management consultant Dorian Benkoil about how the online world is redrawing the line between advertising and editorial — because the alternative may be extinction.

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"Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood and the Prison of Belief"

Friday, January 25, 2013

The Church of Scientology has been notoriously unwelcoming of investigation into its inner workings, but Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright has just released a new book that delves deep into the history and practices of the Church.

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The CIA's Double Standard on Secrecy

Friday, January 18, 2013

In recent years, the CIA has authorized many of its former operatives to land lucrative book deals and pundit gigs — a fact that would have horrified previous generations of spooks. And yet, notes journalist Ted Gup, the agency remains notably selective about the information it allows to be disclosed. Bob talks with Ted about what he calls the CIA's "double standard" on secrecy.

 

Yo-Yo Ma - Bach's Suite for Cello #6 in D Major

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One Big Lie

Friday, January 18, 2013

We now know what many have suspected for some time: Lance Armstrong is a liar and a bully and cheat. Bob talks with NPR's Mike Pesca about Oprah's questions and Armstrong's answers during his Thursday night confession on OWN, Winfrey's TV Channel. 

 

David Byrne - Glass, Concrete & Stone

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The Strangest Hoax in Modern Sports History

Friday, January 18, 2013

Until this week, Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o was famous not just for his on-field skills but for his compelling backstory, which included the tragic death of his girlfriend. This week, the sports blog Deadspin exposed that story as a massive hoax, although it is still unclear what, if any, participation Te'o had in the lie. Bob and Brooke delve into the myth and consider how it snuck by the national media. 

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Privacy and Gun Control

Friday, January 11, 2013

On Thursday, Vice President Biden sketched out early hints of what gun control reform might look like. One potential reform concerns something that you might mistakenly assume already exists: a central database of gun transactions in the US, maintained by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. The NRA has blocked all such efforts in the past. New York Times reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg tells Bob why the ATF's record-keeping on gun sales is actually incredibly antiquated. 

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Corrections

Friday, January 11, 2013

We take a moment to correct two recent mistakes.

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Newspaper Publishes a Map Showing Where Gun Owners Live

Friday, January 11, 2013

Following the school massacre in nearby Connecticut, a New York state paper published a map showing the names and addresses of handgun permit owners in its readership area — all except for one county, where local officials have refused to provide the paper with the information. This decision violates explicit New York State law, but has a supporter in New York state Senator Greg Ball, who tells Bob why he's supporting Putnam County officials.

Yo La Tengo - Stupid Things

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Al Jazeera and the Qatari Government's Editorial Influence

Friday, January 11, 2013

In December, Al Jazeera Berlin correspondent Aktham Suliman left the news outlet, saying he felt its primary funder, the Qatari government, exerted too much influence over Al Jazeera's coverage. Suliman is just the latest in a string of resignations from Al Jazeera in protest of editorial interference. In an interview from August of last year, Bob talks to blogger and political commentator Sultan Al Qassemi about what he sees as the problems with Al Jazeera's coverage of ongoing fighting in Syria.

Yo La Tengo - I'll Be Around

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License Plate Readers and Your Privacy

Friday, January 04, 2013

Police car mounted license plate readers collect date, time and location information and are used by law enforcement around the country to help catch criminals. But when Minneapolis Star Tribune reporter Eric Roper filed a Freedom of Information request for information on his own car, he got a lot more than he bargained for. In a segment that originally aired in August of 2012, Bob talks to Roper about how Minneapolis police and agencies across the country deal with this potentially sensitive location information.

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The NCTC: Obama's "Pre-Crime Squad"?

Friday, January 04, 2013

Last March, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) was granted unprecedented power to collect data on ordinary U.S. citizens, data like flight records or lists of casino employees. Critics have likened the NCTC to the "Pre-Crime Squad" in the movie "Minority Report." Wall Street Journal reporter Julia Angwin talks with Bob about this dramatic shift in the intelligence community's power over US citizens.

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Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, January 04, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

 

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

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National Security Letters and Gag Orders

Friday, January 04, 2013

The most serious kind of subpoena - called a 'National Security Letter' - used to have a lifetime gag-order automatically attached. That is until Nicholas Merrill appealed his and won the right to talk about it. Despite 50,000 national security letters a year, there are only three organizations that have ever won the right to say they got one. In a segment that originally aired in January of 2011, Nick Merrill tells Bob why he's the exception and the rule.

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Will We Ever Watch TV Together Again?

Friday, December 28, 2012

Web TV services, DVRs, and on-demand TV encourage us to ignore the broadcast schedule and watch at our convenience. So what will become of the experience of watching the same show at the same time as your friends? Bob sits down with David Carr, media critic at the New York Times, and Matt Zoller Seitz, New York magazine's TV critic, to see if the water cooler will evolve or perish.

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