Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

The Retro Report

Friday, September 06, 2013

Beginning its second season this week, The Retro Report is a video series that looks at reporting from the past to re-examine its accuracy, and follow up on what happened after the media moved on. Bob talks to Retro Report publisher Taegan Goddard about the stories the Retro Report has looked back on.

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This Town

Friday, September 06, 2013

In his new book This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral—plus plenty of valet parking!—in America's Gilded Capital, Mark Leibovich provides a panoramic view of the ugly behavior Washington elites—journalists, politicians, and lobbyists—engage in. Bob talks to Leibovich about all the sordid details of "This Town."

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The State of Streaming Music

Friday, August 30, 2013

After years of hemorrhaging money from piracy, the music industry placed its faith in online subscription services like Spotify and Pandora. But a decade on, streaming music appears to be a triumph of hope over experience. Tim Carmody, senior writer for The Verge, says that streaming services and the music industry are clinging to the belief that profitability is ... just over the next hill.

 

Vitamin String Quartet - Champagne Supernova

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How Will Journalism Keep The Lights On?

Friday, August 30, 2013

As audiences for media splinter and advertising with it, how will the journalism concerns that we've grown to know and love keep the lights on? Bob talks to Alan Rusbridger of the Guardian, Mike Perlis of Forbes, M. Scott Havens of The Atlantic, Erin Pettigrew of Gawker, Evan Smith of The Texas Tribune, Richard Toffel of ProPublica and Pam Horan of the Online Publishers Association about all the ways they're striving mightily to keep journalism financially viable.  

 

John Lennon - Imagine (Instrumental)

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NPR's Ombudsman Deconstructs an NPR Report

Friday, August 16, 2013

Two years ago, NPR aired a heartbreaking series on government failures in child welfare on South Dakota Indian reservations. Earlier this month, NPR Ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos released a comprehensive report on the series, saying that it was deeply flawed and should not have aired. Bob looks at the series and Schumacher-Matos' response.

Clint Mansell - Cruel Mistress

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The Stories They Carried

Friday, August 16, 2013

The Federal Writers' Project put thousands of people to work including Zora Neale Hurston, Stetson Kennedy, and John Steinbeck. They recorded oral histories, folkways, music and wrote everything from state guides to children's books. In an interview that originally aired in 2008, Bob speaks to Jerrold Hirsch, author of Portrait of America, who describes the legacy of "introducing America to Americans," and how the program upended the American story.

Lunasa - Killarney Boys of Pleasure

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ESPN's Big Bet

Friday, August 16, 2013

As the internet economy emerged, many companies zeroed in on niche groups of consumers to stay in business. ESPN, however, made big money bets on huge sports. Bob talks with the Atlantic's Derek Thompson about how that bet paid off handsomely and about Fox Sports 1 - a new competitor in the cable sports market. 

The Who - Baba O'Riley

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In the Empire Business

Friday, August 09, 2013

As the new owner of the Post, Jeff Bezos becomes one of the most important people in journalism. So who is Jeff Bezos? Bob talks with journalist Brad Stone about Bezos and how he might lead the paper. Stone is the author of The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon -- it'll be released in October. 

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Like A Funeral

Friday, August 09, 2013

Bob speaks with Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi about the scene at the Post when Post CEO and Chairman Don Graham announced the paper's sale to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Farhi had a unique perspective on the sale as the only reporter who knew the announcement was coming. Farhi also lays out the legacy of the Graham family. 

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The Great Newspaper Strike of 1962-1963

Friday, August 09, 2013

Fifty years ago, 17,000 New York City newspaper workers went on strike, shuttering the city's seven daily papers for 114 days. Rooted in fears about new "cold type" printing technology, the strike ended up devastating the city's newspaper culture and launching the careers of a new generation of writers including Tom Wolfe, Gay Talese, and Nora Ephron. Vanity Fair contributor Scott Sherman talks with Bob about the strike and its legacy.

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The Forgotten Network

Friday, August 09, 2013

Television viewers under a certain age think of the big three broadcast networks as having existed since the dawn of time. A misconception, of course - but largely because of what it omits. In TV's earliest days, there was also the DuMont Network, a pioneering enterprise that aired some of its era's most popular programs. Bob talks history with David Weinstein, author of book that chronicles the rise and fall of DuMont.

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Detroit As Metaphor

Friday, August 02, 2013

Since Detroit filed for bankruptcy last month, it's been the subject of intense national coverage. Detroit's also been held up as a metaphor for everything that ails the country financially. Bob talks to historian Kevin Boyle, who has written extensively about the city, about how Detroit is and isn't a good synecdoche for the rest of industrial America.

Nils Frahm - For

  

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A Busy Week In the Security State

Friday, August 02, 2013

This week saw the conviction of Bradley Manning, congressional hearings on intelligence, and more stories broken from the leaks of Edward Snowden to The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald. Bob reflects on the public perception of government surveillance programs, the threats journalists face, and more.

Stateless - Miles to Go

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A Historic Case for Prosecuting Journalists Who Report Leaks

Friday, August 02, 2013

Back in 1942, the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel wrote an opinion that determined a journalist could be in violation of the Espionage Act for reporting leaked information. Bob speaks to Gabriel Schoenfeld, author of Necessary Secrets: National Security, the Media and the Rule of Law about the Chicago Tribune reporter at the center of the case during WWII.

Jun Miyake - Lillies of the Valley

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Steal My Book, Please

Friday, July 26, 2013

Russians have access to more than 100,000 pirated e-books and just 60,000 legitimate e-books. For some authors and publishers the theft is infuriating, but others take the view that it’s good to have your book out there in front of eyes no matter what the cost. In an interview from 2012, Bob speaks with Peter Mountford, author of A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism,  who didn't just turn a blind eye to his book being pirated, but actually helped the process along. Mountford's new book - to be released in 2014 - is A Dismal Science

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"Downloaded"

Friday, July 26, 2013

A new documentary called "Downloaded" explores the history and consequences of the file sharing service Napster. Bob talks to the film's director Alex Winter about how Napster sparked seismic changes we now take for granted in the music industry.

Beastie Boys - Multilateral Nuclear Disarmament 

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Opting in to View Porn in the UK

Friday, July 26, 2013

British Prime Minister David Cameron just announced a bold, two-pronged attack on both pornography that exploits children, and the availability of pornography to children. Bob talks to Mic Wright, tech reporter for the Daily Telegraph, about how Cameron's proposal will be both technically impossible and an invasion of privacy.

Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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American Propaganda Allowed Stateside

Friday, July 19, 2013

The 1948 Smith-Mundt Act was intended to shield U.S. citizens from American propaganda, which the State Department has been broadcasting abroad for decades. This month, the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act takes effect, allowing that material to be broadcast stateside. Bob talks with Washington State Democrat and bill co-sponsor Adam Smith who says there is no need to worry.

Andrew Bird - Orpheo Looks Back

 

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How Threatening Was Domestic Propaganda?

Friday, July 19, 2013

The Smith-Mundt Modernization Act goes into effect this month, lifting prior domestic broadcast bans on U.S. propaganda. Bob talks to historian Thomas Fleming, author of The Illusion of Victory: America in World War One, about how powerful domestic propaganda was in the past, and how unlikely it is to have much impact today.

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A Dangerous "View"

Friday, July 19, 2013

This week, ABC announced that model, comedian, and anti-vaccine activist Jenny McCarthy would be joining the hit daytime talk show The View. Bob looks at the controversy surrounding her hiring and at the media's description of McCarthy's "controversial" views. 

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