Brooke Gladstone

Host, On The Media

Brooke Gladstone appears in the following:

How We Watch TV

Friday, December 28, 2012

There are a lot of ways to watch TV: free streaming online, via a traditional cable or satellite package, paying for services like Hulu Plus, etc. But the TV industry makes vastly different amounts of money depending on how you choose to watch. We invited Peter Kafka, media reporter for the website All Things Digital, to play the part of a moustache-twirling cable baron, and explain which of our staffers have viewing habits he can support, and why.


Earle Hagen and Herbert W. Spencer - The Fishin' Hole

Red Foley - Television

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To Bork

Friday, December 21, 2012

Supreme Court nominee and Constitutional originalist Robert Bork died this week at the age of 85. In a segment that originally aired in 2005, Brooke muses over the verb "to bork," coined in honor of the man whose unsuccessful bid for the bench earned him a place in Webster's.

Frank Ocean - Crack Rock

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Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, December 14, 2012

A hundred years ago this week, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

Califone - Lunar H

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Should Republican Politicians Quit their Fox Addiction?

Friday, December 14, 2012

With the fiscal-cliff fight in its umpteenth week, Republicans want House Speaker John Boehner to sell his fiscal cliff solutions outside the safe confines of Fox News. Buzzfeed's McKay Coppins talks to Brooke about the GOP strategists who want their party to diversify their media appearances.

Archers of Loaf - Mark Price P.I.

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A Correction From a Listener

Friday, December 14, 2012

On last week's show, Brooke interviewed astrophysicist Martin Rees about a new research center that will study existential risks to humanity, including the risk of killer robots. After playing some audio of Kyle Rees, a character from the original "Terminator" movie, Brooke jokingly remarked that there was no relation between Martin and Kyle. OTM listener Ralph Kohler saw a problem with that, and explains it to Brooke.

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"Zero Dark Thirty"

Friday, December 14, 2012

This week’s press screening of "Zero Dark Thirty" has yielded a new headline about the controversial film: that the depicted use of torture to get to Bin laden is dangerously misleading. Brooke discusses the controversy with journalist Peter Bergen, the author of Manhunt: the 10 year search for Osama Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad.

Andrew Pekler - Here Comes The Night

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Living by the Trends in the New York Times Style Section

Friday, December 07, 2012

The New York Times isn't just a source for news; its also the authority on the latest cultural trends—at least, so says Slate contributor and chronically un-hip Brooklynite Justin Peters. He recently used the Times' Style section as a blueprint for living the trendiest life possible. Brooke asks Justin about the results of this "scientific" experiment.

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Private Funding, Medical Journals, and Bias

Friday, December 07, 2012

Private funding of medical studies has eclipsed public funding on the order of billions of dollars a year. Peter Whoriskey, writer for The Washington Post talks to Bob about the potential for bias and misleading information in drug studies funded by the drug companies.

B. Fleischmann - Lemmings

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The Ethics of Photographing Tragedy

Friday, December 07, 2012

This week a man was shoved off a New York subway platform and killed by an oncoming train. A freelance photographer on assignment for the New York Post happened to be on the platform, camera in hand. He shot the scene, and the Post printed a photo of the man’s last moment before being struck by a train on the front page. Brooke talks to New York Times media columnist David Carr about the resulting controversy around the photo.

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In Defense of "Homophobia"

Friday, December 07, 2012

The next print edition of the Associated Press Stylebook will include a new note on the word "phobia," advising writers to avoid the word in "political or social contexts," such as "Islamophobia" or "homophobia." The AP's announcement comes as a disappointment to George Weinberg, the New York pychotherapist who coined the term "homophobia" in 1965. He defends his word to Brooke as both an accurate descriptor and a valuable tool for the LGBT movement.

Do you have suggestions for a word to replace "homophobia" in the 21st century? Let us know! 

Vic Chesnutt - You Are Never Alone

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A Catalyst in the Hollywood Blacklist

Friday, November 30, 2012

The Hollywood Reporter celebrated its 65th anniversary by publishing a feature story on its founder Billy Wilkerson's role in launching the Hollywood blacklists. Brooke talks to Hollywood Reporter senior writer Daniel Miller about the genesis of Wilkerson's anti-communist campaign and why The Hollywood Reporter published this article now.

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"My Stolen Face"

Friday, November 30, 2012

In the summer of 2009, Neda Agha-Soltan became the face of the Iranian Green Revolution after her tragic death by gunshot was caught on cell phone camera and uploaded online for the whole world to see. The international media rushed to put a face to the victim--but the face they used was that of another Iranian woman by the name of Neda Soltani, who was still very much alive. Brooke speaks to Neda Soltani, author of My Stolen Face: The Story of a Dramatic Mistake.

Ballake Sissoko & Vincent Segal- Oscarine

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A Son's Apology for the Communist Blacklists

Friday, November 30, 2012

William 'Willie' Wilkerson III, the son of Hollywood Reporter founder Billy Wilkerson took it upon himself to write an article apologizing for his father's role in the blacklists. Brooke talks to Willie about how the legacy of his father's behavior has followed him.

Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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Is Amazon A New Monopoly?

Friday, November 23, 2012

Without the ability to work together, industry watchers say the 'Big 6' publishers won’t be able to stop Amazon from pricing books as the company sees fit. Brooke speaks with Barry C. Lynn, a senior fellow at the New America Foundation, who believes that the DOJ decision opens the door to an Amazonian monopoly in the book industry.

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Are Publishers Stuck In The Past?

Friday, November 23, 2012

The publishing industry is not the first to be shaken by a newly digital world. It’s also not the first to resist that change. Brooke speaks with Mathew Ingram, a senior writer at GigaOm, who thinks the publishers’ efforts to tame Amazon may delay a brighter future for the book industry.

John Williams - Hedwig's Theme

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The Story of Pottermore

Friday, November 23, 2012

Michael Shatzkin, publishing futurist, tells us the story of Pottermore, J.K. Rowling's one-woman attempt to challenge the mighty Amazon.

Harry and The Potters - This Book is So Awesome

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Life After Publishers

Friday, November 23, 2012

As a newly minted editorial assistant at Norton, writer Tom Bissell was able to resuscitate an out-of-print novel called Desperate Characters by Paula Fox. In Bissell's new book, Magic Hours, he wrote about how, paradoxically, that experience shook his faith in publishing. Brooke talks Bissell about whether we as readers will miss the publishing industry, imperfect as it is, if it disappears.

Julian Smith - I'm Reading A Book

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How Publishing and Reading Are Changing

Friday, November 23, 2012

Publishers are trying to adapt as the book industry changes dramatically, and they're doing so in the face of rapidly changing reading habits among consumers. Brooke talks to journalist David Streitfeld and publishing industry analyst Mike Shatzkin about the changing reading landscape and the ongoing war for readers’ attention.

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Will the Petraeus Scandal Be Good for Privacy?

Friday, November 16, 2012

Privacy is among the many issues raised by the Petraeus affair. We don’t know exactly what the FBI did, or what sort of legal barriers they had to surmount to get access. Reporter Peter Maass wrote that an unexpected consequence of Petreaus’s fall is that we all might learn a little more about how the FBI operates. Brooke spoke with Maass about an unlikely connection between the Petraeus scandal and former Supreme Court Nominee Robert Bork. 

Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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The Houston Chronicle Leaves Mexico

Friday, November 16, 2012

Texas' biggest daily newspaper, The Houston Chronicle, has just closed down its long-standing bureau in Mexico City. Brooke speaks to the former head of the bureau, Dudley Althaus, about what is lost when regional papers shut down their foreign bureaus, and the important relationship between Texas and Mexico.

Los Lobos - El Canelo

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