Brooke Gladstone

Host, On The Media

Brooke Gladstone appears in the following:

Protests for Press Freedom in China

Friday, January 11, 2013

Earlier this week in southern China, protests began after a New Year’s Day op-ed by the newspaper Southern Weekly was censored. In its original form, the op-ed hoped for a new year in which the liberal principles of the Chinese constitution were respected. When that op-ed was reduced to party platitudes by propaganda officials, the paper’s employees briefly went on strike and the protests began. Brooke speaks with Jeremy Goldkorn is the director of Danwei, a firm that researches Chinese media and internet, about the situation. 

The Books - It Never Changes To Stop

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Censorship in the Largest Democracy in the World

Friday, January 11, 2013

The rape and murder of a young woman in India has brought protesters to the streets. Both the national and international press have closely followed the public outrage and tepid response from government officials, turning out in full force to see the accused men in court on Monday. The swarm of journalists prompted a local judge to not only ban reporters from the courtroom, but also prohibit anyone from covering the trial. Brooke talks with New York Times reporter Niharika Mandhana about the repercussions of the ban, and about why the government would keep the trial off the public record. 

Tinariwen - Walla Illa

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The Art of Self-Surveillance

Friday, January 04, 2013

In 2002, artist and professor Hasan Elahi spent six months being interrogated off and on by the FBI as a suspected terrorist. In response to this experience, he created Tracking Transience, a website that makes his every move available to the FBI - and everybody else. In a segment that originally aired in November of 2011, Brooke talks to Elahi about the project.

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"If You’ve Got Nothing to Hide, You’ve Got Nothing to Fear"

Friday, January 04, 2013

Here's a common refrain in privacy discussions: “If you’ve got nothing to hide, you’ve got nothing to fear.” There's also Google’s then-CEO Eric Schmidt famously saying:  "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place." Brooke speaks with George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove who says those types of arguments misunderstand privacy entirely.

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Data Collection Trade-Offs

Friday, January 04, 2013

In Philip Bobbitt's 2008 book Terror and Consent: The Wars for the 21st Century, he argues that data collection is an incredibly useful tool that’s fundamentally misunderstood by the public. Brooke talks with Bobbitt about that and the way the media and public also misunderstand warrants. Bobbitt, law professor at Columbia University is author most recently of The Garments of Court and Palace: Machiavelli and the World That He Made.

 

Build Buildings - Let's Go

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Our Privacy Delusions

Friday, January 04, 2013

We all claim to want privacy online, but that desire is rarely reflected in our online behavior. OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman looks into the futile attempts we make to protect our digital identities.

 

Johannes Brahms - Violin Concerto op.77 in D Major

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How We Watch TV

Friday, December 28, 2012

There are a lot of ways to watch TV: free streaming online, via a traditional cable or satellite package, paying for services like Hulu Plus, etc. But the TV industry makes vastly different amounts of money depending on how you choose to watch. We invited Peter Kafka, media reporter for the website All Things Digital, to play the part of a moustache-twirling cable baron, and explain which of our staffers have viewing habits he can support, and why.


Earle Hagen and Herbert W. Spencer - The Fishin' Hole

Red Foley - Television

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When is it OK to Spoil?

Friday, December 28, 2012

People who watch TV when it actually airs and blab about it online can ruin it for those of us who watch shows at our leisure. Their excited Twitter chatter about the great twist in last night’s Mad Men is frustrating if you haven’t yet watched last night’s Mad Men. New Yorker TV critic Emily Nussbaum is a prolific tweeter who began grappling with this problem after Twitter users complained about a phenomenon they called "Nussbombing." She talks to Brooke about her evolving system of spoiler etiquette.

 

Big Joe Turner - TV Mama

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Why TV Is So Good Right Now

Friday, December 28, 2012

One of the surprising side effects of the upheavals in the TV industry’s business model is that, for now, we’re actually living in a golden age of scripted television. Television networks have found that one of the few predictable ways to build an audience is to create content that’s really, really good. Alan Sepinwall covers TV for Hitfix.com and is the author of the new book The Revolution Was Televised. He tells Bob about the unlikely path that led us to this TV renaissance.

 

Battles - White Electric (Shabazz Palaces Remix)

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TV Hijackers

Friday, December 28, 2012

On a Sunday evening in the late 1980s, two or more unknown men hijacked the signal for two Chicago area TV stations. They broadcast a spooky, subversive, disturbing message — twice. Brooke talks to Bohus Blahut, a Chicago broadcaster, who saw the broadcast and was unable to forget it. 

 

Doctor Who Theme - Delia Derbyshire/Ron Grainer

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To Bork

Friday, December 21, 2012

Supreme Court nominee and Constitutional originalist Robert Bork died this week at the age of 85. In a segment that originally aired in 2005, Brooke muses over the verb "to bork," coined in honor of the man whose unsuccessful bid for the bench earned him a place in Webster's.

Frank Ocean - Crack Rock

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Should Republican Politicians Quit their Fox Addiction?

Friday, December 14, 2012

With the fiscal-cliff fight in its umpteenth week, Republicans want House Speaker John Boehner to sell his fiscal cliff solutions outside the safe confines of Fox News. Buzzfeed's McKay Coppins talks to Brooke about the GOP strategists who want their party to diversify their media appearances.

Archers of Loaf - Mark Price P.I.

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A Correction From a Listener

Friday, December 14, 2012

On last week's show, Brooke interviewed astrophysicist Martin Rees about a new research center that will study existential risks to humanity, including the risk of killer robots. After playing some audio of Kyle Rees, a character from the original "Terminator" movie, Brooke jokingly remarked that there was no relation between Martin and Kyle. OTM listener Ralph Kohler saw a problem with that, and explains it to Brooke.

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"Zero Dark Thirty"

Friday, December 14, 2012

This week’s press screening of "Zero Dark Thirty" has yielded a new headline about the controversial film: that the depicted use of torture to get to Bin laden is dangerously misleading. Brooke discusses the controversy with journalist Peter Bergen, the author of Manhunt: the 10 year search for Osama Bin Laden from 9/11 to Abbottabad.

Andrew Pekler - Here Comes The Night

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Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, December 14, 2012

A hundred years ago this week, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery." 

Califone - Lunar H

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Living by the Trends in the New York Times Style Section

Friday, December 07, 2012

The New York Times isn't just a source for news; its also the authority on the latest cultural trends—at least, so says Slate contributor and chronically un-hip Brooklynite Justin Peters. He recently used the Times' Style section as a blueprint for living the trendiest life possible. Brooke asks Justin about the results of this "scientific" experiment.

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The Ethics of Photographing Tragedy

Friday, December 07, 2012

This week a man was shoved off a New York subway platform and killed by an oncoming train. A freelance photographer on assignment for the New York Post happened to be on the platform, camera in hand. He shot the scene, and the Post printed a photo of the man’s last moment before being struck by a train on the front page. Brooke talks to New York Times media columnist David Carr about the resulting controversy around the photo.

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In Defense of "Homophobia"

Friday, December 07, 2012

The next print edition of the Associated Press Stylebook will include a new note on the word "phobia," advising writers to avoid the word in "political or social contexts," such as "Islamophobia" or "homophobia." The AP's announcement comes as a disappointment to George Weinberg, the New York pychotherapist who coined the term "homophobia" in 1965. He defends his word to Brooke as both an accurate descriptor and a valuable tool for the LGBT movement.

Do you have suggestions for a word to replace "homophobia" in the 21st century? Let us know! 

Vic Chesnutt - You Are Never Alone

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Private Funding, Medical Journals, and Bias

Friday, December 07, 2012

Private funding of medical studies has eclipsed public funding on the order of billions of dollars a year. Peter Whoriskey, writer for The Washington Post talks to Bob about the potential for bias and misleading information in drug studies funded by the drug companies.

B. Fleischmann - Lemmings

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A Son's Apology for the Communist Blacklists

Friday, November 30, 2012

William 'Willie' Wilkerson III, the son of Hollywood Reporter founder Billy Wilkerson took it upon himself to write an article apologizing for his father's role in the blacklists. Brooke talks to Willie about how the legacy of his father's behavior has followed him.

Johan Borger - Goodnight My Friend

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