Brooke Gladstone

Host, On The Media

Brooke Gladstone appears in the following:

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, May 02, 2014

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery."

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Joking With Robots

Friday, April 18, 2014

Myq Kaplan is a comedian known for his "robotic" delivery of jokes. That made him the perfect candidate to compete with Manatee, a joke-telling robot. Brooke talks with Kaplan about how robots might someday co-opt his comedic style.

Music: Dan Magnan - Robots. Special thanks to @jonaswoost (Jonas Woost) for the suggestion on Twitter!

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Engineering Intelligence

Friday, April 18, 2014

Despite the technological leaps made in the realm of artificial intelligence, people often object to the idea that the minds of machines can ever replicate the minds of humans. But for engineers, the proof is in the processing. Brooke talks with Stanford lecturer and entrepreneur Jerry Kaplan about how the people who make robots view the field of AI. 

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Our Universal Robots

Friday, April 18, 2014

The word 'robot' first appeared in 1920 in Karel Čapek's play, Rossum's Universal Robots. Since then, intelligent machines have starred countless times in novels and films. Brooke talks with professor Jay P. Telotte about the ways our fears and fascinations with robots are reflected in culture. 

Music: Calexico - Attack El Robot! Attack! Special thanks to @bartona104 (Julia Barton) for the suggestion on Twitter!

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Robot Humor

Friday, April 18, 2014

We often think of robots as tools to make our lives easier. But what if they could also make our lives funnier?

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Google's Robot Brigade

Friday, April 18, 2014

Google has recently scooped up more than a half dozen robot companies. Their specialties range from artificial limbs to 3D machine vision to scurrying insect-bots and humanoid soldiers. But Google has kept mum about why they're acquiring these technologies. Brooke talks with Henrik Christensen, a professor of robotics at Georgia Tech, about what Google might do with its new toys. 

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Someone Has a Koch Addiction

Friday, April 11, 2014

Democrats have made the Koch Brothers and the millions they've spent on political ads a central issue in midterm elections. Fiery language has been thrown around on both sides, with Harry Reid calling the brothers "un-American" and Charles Koch saying his opponents are "collectivists." Brooke talks with New York Times reporter Carl Hulse, who says the intensity of this clash of the titans is only going to go up.

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100 Days in Rwanda

Friday, April 11, 2014

Monday marked the 20th anniversary of the start of Rwandan Genocide. In the massacre, which took place over one hundred days, more than 800,000 minority Tutsis were slaughtered by members of the Hutu majority. In 2002, Brooke spoke with director and producer Nick Hughes about his film 100 Days in Rwanda, and about creating an historical fiction which used a love story to humanize the slaughter.

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The Camera and the Color Line

Friday, April 11, 2014

As a kid, writer and photographer Syreeta McFadden was never satisfied with the way she looked in pictures. But it wasn't physical appearance that bothered her; it was the way the camera captured—or, failed to capture—her dark skin. Brooke talks to Syreeta about how racial bias lies within the chemistry of photography.

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On Letterman, Colbert and America

Friday, April 11, 2014

David Letterman, who boasts the longest tenure of a late night host on broadcast TV, announced his retirement. The news was quickly followed by the announcement of his replacement – Stephen Colbert. Brooke and Bob discuss the problems of bringing a comedian so associated with the political left onto network television, and the loss of a national satire icon.

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Section 317

Friday, April 04, 2014

The Supreme Court ruled this week to raise the limit for individual campaign contributions from $123,000 to $3.6 million dollars. Limits are in place to prevent deep-pocketed donors from corrupting the democratic process, which includes political advertising. Brooke speaks to former FCC Commissioner Michael J. Copps about Section 317 of the Communications Act, the FCC's as-yet-enforced dictum that we are entitled to know by whom we are being persuaded. 

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Television Without Pity

Friday, April 04, 2014

Television Without Pity began as a Dawson’s Creek fan site in the late 90s, and was bought by NBC Universal in 2007. Now NBC Universal is shutting down the site, and the forums it spawned. Brooke speaks with Emily Nussbaum, the New Yorker’s television critic, who came to TWOP early and then stayed and stayed. 

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Case Closed

Friday, April 04, 2014

A new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) not only presents dire evidence of global warming's impact, it also offers a different narrative about who is at risk, putting humans at the center of the story. Brooke talks with science journalist Cristine Russell about the IPCC's media-ready case.

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How Much Oil Really Spilled?

Friday, March 28, 2014

On the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Southwest Alaska, the media reported, as they have since the disaster happened, that the amount of oil spilled was 11 million gallons. In 2010, Brooke spoke with Riki Ott - a marine toxicologist and author - who explained that the 11 million number is in fact a disputed figure the media have incorrectly adopted.

 

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The World According to Google Maps

Friday, March 28, 2014

On Google Maps, Crimea is still a part of Ukraine, though Vladimir Putin is urging the mapping behemoth to redraw Russia's borders to include the Black Sea peninsula. Whatever Google decides, it’s sure to be politically and culturally fraught.

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The History of the Quiz

Friday, March 28, 2014

The BuzzFeed quiz is ubiquitous; it seems as irresistible as it is inescapable. But when did we first start taking quizzes? Writer Sarah Laskow recently embarked on a quest to find out. She takes Brooke through her search for the Ur Quiz.

Try On the Media's first (and maybe last) quiz: Which 19th Century Media Baron Are You?

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Taking Healthcare Literally

Friday, March 28, 2014

Bob speaks with Yurina Melara who covers public health for the Los Angeles-based La Opinion, the largest Spanish language daily in the US. She says that telling the 38 million Spanish-speaking Americans about Obamacare is only half the battle. The other half is making sure they understand what it is...beginning with the literal translation of “health care.”

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Letters

Friday, March 28, 2014

Brooke and Bob read a few of your letters and comments.

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Which Public Radio Hosts Are Our Hosts?

Friday, March 28, 2014

Brooke and Bob share their results from a number of quizzes - including Which Public Radio Host Are You? - and discuss what (if anything) they've learned about themselves and this viral sensation. 

By the way, we have our own quiz, too! Find out which 19th century media baron you are here

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So Many Keys

Friday, March 21, 2014

Four times a year, members of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICAAN, take part in an elaborate ceremony (iris scanners!) designed to assure the world that the organization is doing its best to keep the web connected and safe. Brooke explains the meeting of the keyholders, with insight from Guardian reporter James Ball, who attended one of the ceremonies last month.

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