August 25, 2006

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Friday, August 25, 2006

The loneliest Iranian correspondent, the child porn beat, poor marks for economic columnists.

The News from Iran

The view from here is that Iran is a closed society with no outside (aka Western) news, information, or entertainment slipping in. Is it true? Or, are Iranians offered a variety of global views via satellite television and the internet? As America’s diplomatic stalemate with Iran becomes increasingly prominent in ...

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The Loneliness of the Long Distance Correspondent

American news audiences heard a lot about Iran this week, but what were Iranians hearing about the U.S.? Not much, at least if they were relying on first person accounts. There are currently only two Iranian correspondents officially based in the U.S. and neither is allowed to travel beyond a ...

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Creep Beat

When the New York Times ran a series this week about the dark corners of online child pornography, the paper made a point of telling readers that it alerted authorities to illegal websites Kurt Eichenwald discovered in the process of reporting. It wasn’t the first time a child porn story ...

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Letters

Our listeners weigh in on NSA wiretapping, upstanding small-town movie critics, and how to talk if you’re in the Northwest.

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What's the scoop, HAL.

And we thought our jobs were safe. New technology has always made easier some of the more menial tasks of the journalist, especially those of market and wire reporters? But at Thomson Financial in New York, machines are now journalists, too. Bob speaks with Director of Content Development Andrew Meagher ...

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Single Factor Analysis

It has often been the practice of market analysts to tie economic movement to the day’s news. But can the trading of billions of shares really be traced back to one driving agent – political, economic, or otherwise? Back in ’03, Bob took a long – and of course, skeptical ...

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