August 4, 2006

« previous episode | next episode »

Friday, August 04, 2006

Perilous times for a wartime president, porn, baseball announcers, the atomic bomb and bombshells.

Perilous Times

What does George W. Bush have in common with John Adams, Abraham Lincoln, FDR, Harry Truman, JFK, and Lyndon Johnson? Each is a wartime president who took measures to quell dissent at home in the name of an American victory. And all of them, according to Geoffrey R. Stone’s book ...

Comment

Keeping Secrets

New York Times reporter William L. Laurence was with American troops in a plane over Nagasaki when the atomic bomb was dropped. He won the Pulitzer Prize for a series of stories he subsequently published, many of which included details about the development and production of the bomb that he ...

Comment

Pornucopia

Pornography is a form rife with easily-recognizable tropes. Strategic lighting, hokey music, and close-up camera angles all are a part of creating the aspirational and idealized world of porn. In last October’s issue of Harper’s, Frederick Kaufman took a closer look at the cable channel he thinks is the most ...

Comment

Baseball Announcers

Baseball purists recoil at televised coverage, claiming glib announcers, exploding graphics, and jarring sound effects treat the on-field action as a mere afterthought. Baseball purists, of course, are a bitter lot. Still, for many committed fans, the fame is best maintained unchanged, and, as Rex Doane reports, old-time radio announcers ...

Comments [1]

The Sporting Life

Over 25 years, fantasy sports have become a real-world pastime, changing how millions of fans interact with actual sports played on actual fields. Fan-ship used to be about favorite teams; now, fantasy players live or die by the fortunes of players who may not even be on their favorite teams. ...

Comment

Woodstein's Muse

Watching the new DVD release of All the President’s Men recently, Brooke came upon a bombshell, buried in one of the DVD’s commentary tracks. It concerns the unlikely genesis of what has become the prevailing symbol of all that is fine in American journalism.

Comment

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.