June 2, 2006

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Friday, June 02, 2006

Chaos in the TV business, early American propagandists, a supreme blow to whistleblowers

Conduct Unbecoming

The alleged massacre at Haditha, first reported by Time Magazine, commanded headlines this week. As the press waited for results from internal investigations, comparisons to My Lai massacre were not uncommon. Which reminded us of something Army Lieutenant Colonel Robert Bateman told us right before the Iraq war – that ...

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(Don’t) Whistle While You Work

Employees who blow the whistle on workplace misconduct have long been accorded special legal protection from retribution. But if the employee is a public employee, and speaks out while still clocked in, that protection no longer applies. At least that’s what the Supreme Court says, in a split ruling handed ...

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Chaos, Revisited

A little while ago, Bob took out his crystal ball, and looked into the brave new media future. What he saw didn’t bode well for traditional keepers of the broadcast universe: viewers using DVRs to tune out commercials, and networks bypassing affiliates with online content streaming. A year later, Bob’s ...

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Totally Tubular

If somebody forwarded you a link to a silly video recently, there’s a good chance you watched it on YouTube. The site has been around for only a year, but it already has more than 12 million visitors every month. Brooke speaks with San Jose Mercury News reporter Michelle Quinn ...

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The Arizona Project

Journalists have long been among the casualties of foreign wars, and Iraq is no exception. But we’re less accustomed to reporters dying in the line of duty here at home. Which may be why the death of The Arizona Republic’s Don Bolles still resonates. He was covering organized crime when ...

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Founding Propagandists

All lofty pretensions aside, American journalism was actually founded by a combination of crusading publishers, government leakers, and opinion writers who never used their real names. That’s according to the new book, Infamous Scribblers: The Founding Fathers and the Rowdy Beginnings of American Journalism. Author (and Fox News host) Eric ...

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