May 19, 2006

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Friday, May 19, 2006

Global warming as comedy, fair use is fair, more on phone tracking.

Getting to the Source

If they don’t already, government insiders with a tidbit for the press might now think twice before dishing over the phone. This week, two reporters at ABC News said that the Feds were gathering their phone records, most probably to sniff out the source of government leaks. OTM guest host ...

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No Enemies’ List

With government phone surveillance so much in the news, it’s understandable that some assumed the collection of reporters’ phone records has something to do with the recently-disclosed NSA data mining effort. But that sort of conflation frustrates defense analyst Bill Arkin. He tells Brooke what’s wrong with understanding contemporary intelligence ...

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Sick With Worry

Avian flu continues to garner headlines – last week’s good, but this week’s bad. In either case, concerns about a pandemic are still real, at least judging from the press. And yet fewer than 150 people have been killed by the illness worldwide. Mike Pesca talks about media and the ...

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Dangerous Extremes

For years, mainstream reporting on climate change played down the threat, by playing up the impression that the jury was still out about its causes and effects. But looking at recent media, the debate seems to have quieted down, and signs of looming apocalypse are everywhere. Advocates hail the attention, ...

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Hot in Hollywood

Climate change may be a tough sell for newspaper editors, but what about sitcom writers? Lately the subject has been popping up in some unexpected places, and behind many of these plot twists is actor and environmental activist Laurie David, a co-producer of the new Al Gore documentary. She tells ...

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Fair Use Follies

Simply put, “fair use” is a legal principle that allows copyrighted material to be used without permission from or payment to the owner. But a recent symposium on the subject at New York University demonstrated just how difficult it is to know what constitutes fair. And in the meantime, many ...

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Cloudy and Fair

Fordham University law professor Hugh Hansen is an advocate of strong copyright laws. But even he concedes that for low-budget filmmakers, copyright can be more of a burden than a blessing. Brooke speaks with him and with Duke law professor James Boyle, who thinks copyright holders have ushered in a ...

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Cribbing Through the Ages

Plagiarism is constantly in the news these days, most recently with the scandal surrounding Harvard student Kaavya Viswanathan’s How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got A Life. But, as we know, claims of literary plagiarism go back centuries. So why do people still get so worked up about ...

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