November 24, 2006

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Friday, November 24, 2006

Show Summary: Why Democratic leadership is good for journalism. And, Bob takes the temperature of press freedom in Turkey.

The Power of Myth

Election-night graphics had barely faded from TV screens before the media rushed in to explain what the vote meant. One narrative was that the Republican base turned against its party because it felt betrayed. Another was that the electorate was registering its disgust with the war. ...

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Don’t Wanna Be Your Dog

One constituency that will benefit from the Democratic takeover of Congress is journalists. At least that’s what National Journal columnist William Powers says. It’s not that Dems appeal to journalists’ own sympathies exactly, but that they’re prone to infighting and hijinks, both of which make for good ...

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Turkishness

In considering Turkey’s application for membership, the European Union has identified a number of stumbling blocks. Among them is Article 301 of the Turkish penal code, which criminalizes “insulting Turkishness” and is often used to prosecute writers and journalists. Bob traveled to Istanbul this ...

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Letters

Listeners weigh in with reactions to Bob's interview last week with Lou Dobbs.

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Black, White & Red All Over

On November 10, 1898, a mob of white supremacists ransacked the city of Wilmington, North Carolina, and toppled its biracial government. 108 years later, The Charolotte Observer and Raleigh’s News & Observer are apologizing for their role in fomenting the violence. Duke

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Never The Same Mainstream Twice

Aficionados of partisan media -- left and right -- are all familiar with the initials MSM. For the past few years, both sides have been using the three letters to stand in for everything that is lame about their establishment counterparts. Last year, Brooke spoke with NYU ...

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Playing One On TV

Increasingly, print journalists are joining TV's ranks of talking heads. Punditry comes easy to some reporters. But not everybody is born to bloviate. And so one Washington P.R. firm is training journalists with little or no TV experience for their star turns as pundits. OTM's John Solomon attended ...

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