January 5, 2007

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Friday, January 05, 2007

Show summary: Watching Saddam's execution here and in the Arab world, and the Future of the Internet.

Hanged Jury

How is Saddam Hussein’s execution playing in the Arab media? Depends on your sectarian filter. Arab media watcher Marc Lynch says that even the few outlets representing Shiite and Sunni viewpoints are themselves starting to come apart at the seams.

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Death Watch

Most would agree that the Saddam execution video is “watchable” in a way the Nicholas Berg or Daniel Pearl decapitation videos aren’t. But art critic Richard Woodward says it still looks too much like a snuff film, and thus helps cement his legacy as ...

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Letters

Listeners weigh in on Brooke’s atheism report, Bob’s climbers-in-distress report, and on our public radio satire.

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Who Controls the Internet?

The Internet began as a digital Wild West, lawless and immune from market or government control. Columbia law professor Tim Wu explains not only how important national borders have proven to be, but also why policing them might not be so bad.

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Wi-Fi America

For some time, wireless Internet has been available in places like coffee shops and airport terminals. But now municipalities are moving to expand WiFi networks city-wide. OTM’s Mark Phillips reports that how cities choose to build the networks could have a big effect on the end ...

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Web Thinks

Efforts are underway to create a new generation of the web that’s smarter and more intuitive than the web we use today. Artificial Intelligence expert Nigel Shadbolt explains “Web 3.0,” and just how smart we can expect the future Internet to be.

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The Persistence of Memory

Computer scientist Gordon Bell is at the vanguard of a movement called “lifelogging,” digitally recording every moment of his day in an effort to create a complete virtual memory of his life. But why? We talk with Bell and also technology writer Clive Thompson ...

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