February 23, 2007

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Friday, February 23, 2007

Show Summary: Evangelicals in the press, the satellite radio monopoly deal, and the myth of the longest campaign ever.

The Greening of America

Three years old and in bankruptcy, Air America lurches along. The brothers Green are buying the network, but industry watcher Brian Maloney says they’re not really buying anything at all.

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One if by FCC

This week, XM and Sirius announced plans to merge. The deal still awaits approval by regulators, whose license of the satellite radio companies explicitly forbids their merger. But despite the hurdles, telecom analyst Blair Levin says it’s likely a go.

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Faith in the Word

Though many and varied throughout America, Evangelicals are often cast by media as a conservative monolith. Tim Morgan, deputy editor of Christianity Today, wants to save “the E word” from permanent stigmatization.

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Letters

Listeners respond to last week's piece about whether the American debate about Israel is being squelched.

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Heart of Darkness

A few months ago, President Bush mentioned that he’d just read King Leopold’s Ghost. It's a timely study in media manipulation and the potential of investigative reporting, so we called on author Adam Hochschild to discuss his portrait of crimes in

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Backin’ Black

Media consultant David Axelrod has gained a reputation for packaging black candidates for white voters. But The Nation's Christopher Hayes says the real challenge may be selling Barack Obama to fellow African-Americans.

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Trail of Years

We’re in the midst of the earliest campaign season ever. Or are we? Historian Michael Kazin makes the case that not only has permanent politicking being going on for years, but it's actually part and parcel of the electoral system itself.

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Bit of Fluff

You think the news media should ignore Britney’s noggin and turn its attention to only serious matters? Bob disagrees, and offers this defense of the trivial.

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