Dreams of Electric Sheep

Friday, June 29, 2007

Transcript

25 years ago this week, Blade Runner debuted in American theaters. It was set in a Los Angeles of the future, but its portrayals of race and racism had plenty of resonance in 1982. Reporter Phillip Martin looks back on a classic of cyborgian social criticism.

Comments [3]

Rick Umali from Arlington, MA, USA

Very nice report. It gave me a better appreciation of this movie, which is one of my favorites. There's a lot going on in this film, but crystallizing this movie as a movie about race and humanity is terrific. It's indeed why the movie still resonates with me, and with many others.

Jul. 27 2007 11:04 AM
mpesca from nyc

Great report! Almos on the cell phone while shooting Galactica- that's legwork...the one thing though is I don't think Evan and Bruce Almighty were SATIRIZING the "mystical Black man" trend, I think they were the ultimate expression of it. But this was a very thought provoking report which left me to think that if Androids do dream of electroinic sheep some of them MUST be the black sheep.

Jul. 02 2007 01:24 PM
haans petruschke from kirTland Ohio

Hi,

It was interesting to hear Martin's report. Still Blade Runner was relegated to "Best Science Fiction Movie" When many believe, myself included it is the best movie ever made period.

Science fiction gets little respect. probably because it is so difficult for many to displace themselves and see how a world with different technology can be more relevant to our current situation than anything done in a contemporary or historic setting.

Because of this displacement Science Fiction is often able to explore subjects that would be taboo in a more conventional setting.

Thanks for the report. Too bad you could not get Harrison Ford to comment on this film. Probably his best performance.

Jul. 02 2007 07:41 AM

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