The Sex Drive

Friday, September 07, 2007

Transcript

From early photography to the VCR to streaming video, innovations in communications technology have often been driven by porn. But sex and tech Wired correspondent Regina Lynn argues that porn may be losing its innovation mojo, at least online.

Comments [5]

Regina Lynn

H Cheng -- Make the blind see? No. The porn for the blind took an old and rather mean joke and turned it into a service, "translating" visual porn to audio, just to see if people (vision-impaired or otherwise) would like it.

Ben Hamm -- my comment about 12-17 year olds not having seen porn was deadpan, because one cannot say on the media that teenagers look at porn, except in the context of "oh my god save the children isn't this horrible let's burn the internet down." Apologies if the deadpan didn't come through the audio. It was pretty obvious if you could've seen my face. ;-)

Scott Lackland -- thanks for the kind words!

Jason -- Yes, interactive porn did exist when we recorded this (and still does -- as does sex in virtual spaces) -- I will have to listen again to see what section you are referring to, as I would not have said that it did not. But interactive in the sense of the Star Trek holodeck, or of true full-body teledildonics, did not and still does not.

I know I'm three years too late in responding but I just now found this while searching for something else. :)

Thanks for listening!

~ Regina

Nov. 19 2010 10:46 PM
Jason from Seattle

User interactive porn, as described as not existing in this piece, does in fact exist. YouPorn.com, PornoTube.com and NewbieNudes.com are all user generated content, with user ratings, and there's a pornographic version of Second Life called Red Light Center Adult Virtual World out there too.

Sep. 15 2007 01:50 AM
Scott Lackland from California

The guest's main points regarding web-based interaction changing pornography are quite valid. The same social shift of interactivity is being seen throughout all media. Pornography once lead media technology change. Factors of high demand, controlled production, restricted distribution, and high profits, all drove technology change-outs. Now, video can be made and distributed by the masses - as a hobby. Restrictions, can be circumvented by international web-hosting. Porn studio profits are no longer sufficient to re-invest in the new interactive technologies. The tech start-ups will branch into interactive sexual fantasy, for the 21st century porn.

Sep. 12 2007 11:22 AM
Ben Hamm from Philadelphia

In your segment on the state of innovation in the porn industry, your guest Regina Lynn said something so naive as to completely discredit her authority regarding internet porn:

"If you think of today's 12-17 year-olds who have not yet looked at porn, when they turn 18 and they look at their very first adult content...."

That may be the most misinformed statement I've ever heard on OTM. It is the height of naivete to suppose that underage boys do not view pornography-- on the contrary, they are possibly some its most avid consumers. Perhaps it would be advisable to include a male in your next discussion of pornography.

Sep. 11 2007 11:27 AM
H. Cheng

I find the mentioning of porn making the blind see or making people blind really distasteful. What does the blind have to do with porn in the first place? Worthless comments like that serve nothing to the story , but make the interviewer look smart supposedly. In truth, it makes her sound stupid and insensitive.

Sep. 09 2007 10:48 PM

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