December 14, 2007

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Friday, December 14, 2007

Show Summary: Brooke goes to New Hampshire, pre-primary; soldiers blog; and sneaky advertising.

On Natural Elections

There's a good chance that the Federal Election Commission will head into 2008 without enough confirmed members to act. What then? Former FEC Chairman Brad Smith and Paul Ryan of the Campaign Legal Center weigh in. Plus, a campaign reform loophole as big as the Ron Paul blimp.

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Vote First or Die

In the race to the ballot box the citizens of New Hampshire have long been first. In fact, it’s the law (okay, it’s their law). Brooke travels north to find out why the state is so determined to maintain its granite grip on the primacy of ...

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The Blog of War

Controversies erupted recently, at both the liberal New Republic and conservative National Review Online, involving soldiers-turned-writers whose work contained now-admitted inaccuracies. Military historian Robert Bateman weighs in on the history of war stories as told by warriors.

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Spur of the Moment

Can you find the word “sex” in these ice cubes? Yeah, neither can we. Fifty years ago the notion of subliminal advertising entered America’s collective consciousness and caused mass paranoia. But subliminal ads don’t work and never have. NYU professor Mark Crispin Miller explains.

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Head Space

In New York City a billboard emits highly focused sound that resonates within the skulls of passersby. It’s a novel way of advertising, a potentially terrifying intrusion and, according to technology writer Clive Thompson, the leading edge of a new civil rights battleground ...

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