At the Wire's End

Friday, March 14, 2008

Transcript

The series finale of "The Wire" aired last weekend. The media loved the show for its realistic depiction of an ailing American city but OTM's Mark Phillips takes a look at what happened when "The Wire" turned its attention back on the media.

Comments [4]

chipper from Pasadena

The Wire the best adult show ever, though I agree what I felt were the wrongs of Templeton were not well fleshed out in season 5, but everything else.... come on ! Omar jumping out of the apartment and how he meets his end, Bub's getting clean and finally the social failure with Michael becoming the new local outlaw and sadly Duky ends up as just another dope fiend. An incredible depiction of inter city troubles.

Thank you to all involved in bring it to life.

Mar. 22 2008 06:07 PM
RV

Actually Goldberg most definitely did miss Simon's point about the media, as well as most things that happened on the show.

Mar. 18 2008 02:32 PM
Tidge from Ypsilanti

First: David Simon, Ed Burns. Thank you for The Wire.

Second: Simon's complaint that "only one or two (critics) got the point" about how the Media has missed "everything that is going on" rings hollow. He might as well complain that the critics miss the point that street drugs ruin people's lives.

Part of the WRITER'S job is to actually put clues, telegraph character arcs, offer perspectives, etc. on the THEME he thinks is important. Throughout Season 5, we are repeatedly given clues that the "good" writers and editors at the Sun have great contacts and relationships with the BPD...and aside from a weird McNulty moment with Templeton, the viewer gets no criticism that even comes close to Simon's "Ultimate Point(tm)".

If he wants *me* to believe him, he better do it in Season six ;)

Mar. 16 2008 07:10 PM
DHansen

Dude, 9pm EST on a Sunday night? How about another lowrated but critically acclaimed series called Battlestar Galactica? It's back Sunday 4/6 with two specials the Sunday before to catch you up.

Mar. 15 2008 06:13 PM

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