April 4, 2008

« previous episode | next episode »

Friday, April 04, 2008

Show Summary: Can a magazine piece be a human rights violation in Canada; and why are media still covering the race for the Democratic nomination?

Pressing On

For some in the media, the race for the Democratic nomination is effectively over. Most outlets, however, continue to cover every twist and turn as if it all still matters. Slate political reporter Chris Beam, Atlantic associate editor Marc Ambinder and ABC News political director David ...

Comments [13]

Editors in Chief

For supporters of Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama the candidates' Wikipedia pages have become a key election battleground. The up-to-the-second nature of user-generated, user-corrected content means that an editor’s work is never done. The New Republic's Eve Fairbanks explains the political stakes of wiki-work.

Comments [4]

Al Jazeera's American Face

For the past two years, David Marash has been the face of Al Jazeera English as their Washington anchor. Recently Marash decided to leave the network, however, citing anti-American bias. He joins us to talk about his time there and his decision to depart.

Comments [1]

The Convenient Untruths

Psychologists have long known that humans have a remarkable ability to tune out facts that don't jibe with pre-existing beliefs. Farhad Manjoo, author of True Enough: Learning to Live in a Post-Fact Society, says the natural draw toward "truthiness" has run amok in the modern media ...

Comments [15]

Writing a Wrong

A group of Canadian Muslim students has filed a complaint under their country's Human Rights Act against Maclean's magazine for a piece they feel violated their human rights. The case has sparked a debate in Canada about press freedoms and multiculturalism. One of the students who ...

Comments [139]

Update

A new poll finds that for the first time in years, opinion of the U.S. abroad has improved. Now, 35% of respondents think the U.S. is a positive influence.

Comments [1]

A Call to Rebels

For more than a decade, Rwandan rebels have been living at large in The Democratic Republic of Congo. Mike India, a one-man radio operation, spends his nights on the mic trying to convince them to lay down their arms and go home. Reporter Michael Kavanagh went to Congo for the ...

Comment

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.