August 06, 2004

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Friday, August 06, 2004

Transcript

How medical journals are manipulated by drug companies to churn out good research news and more!

Iraq Calling

The number one media outlet in Iraq right now is the independent talk radio station, Radio Dijla. The winning formula is a combination of free-wheeling conversation, news they can use, and attention to the real priorities of the real people. The station's founder and director, Ahmad al-Rikaby, joins Brooke and ...

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Smells Like Censorship

Simon Haselock was the head of media development and regulation for the former Coalition Provisional Authority. He has been criticized for taking a heavy hand in creating the FCC-like Independent Media Commission to regulate the Iraqi media. Now Haselock is worried that all the checks and balances he had suggested ...

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China Crisis

In China, the bold and hugely successful tabloid, The Southern Metropolis Daily, made journalistic history last year when it affected actual change with one of its exposes. But good things come to an end and now the paper's crusading editor is sitting in jail awaiting charges. Meanwhile, two of his ...

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Updates and Letters

An update, some apologies and a letter.

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Mooning the Media

This past March, roughly a dozen legislators gathered in a Senate office building to honor the Reverend Sun Myung Moon's most durable media brand, The Washington Times. Or so they thought. Actually, they were there to crown Moon "humanity's Savior, Messiah, Returning Lord and True Parent." Reporter John Gorenfeld broke ...

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Doctor, I've a Pain in My HIPAA

Medical reporters play a vital role in documenting hospital practices, but the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA is making it increasingly difficult for them to do so. Andrew Holtz is a freelance medical reporter based in Portland, Oregon and was the former head of the Association of ...

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Medical Malpractice

We’ve all heard alarming stories about the extent to which pharmaceutical companies have their hands in what appear to be objective studies on their products. So it comes as a great relief to many patients and physicians alike that there are medical journals to sniff out the real breakthroughs from ...

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