The Still Small Voice

Friday, November 21, 2008

Transcript

Small, web-only, not-for-profit newsrooms are springing up around the country and scooping much larger dailies with nuts-and-bolts reporting. Voice of San Diego, for example, has managed to uncover a handful of government scandals in the past few years with a staff of only ten. Executive editor Scott Lewis believes this may be the future of journalism.
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Comments [2]

ricky from san diego

This local san diego site has had success, and God bless them. It's too bad much of it has to be portrayed at the expense of the local paper, which still churns out some pretty good journalism. http://tinyurl.com/vosd4th

Feb. 10 2009 01:46 AM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

While we really do have an army of journalists and amateur journalists out there working at starvation wages uncovering a few government scandals, the success of this mission lies in what Lawrence Lessig was talking about the other night with Charlie Rose. We need a hybrid platform for our culture, which should definitely include news, and that will depend on respect for the non-profit element by the inherently profit-producing one.

That is not going to come easy.

Luckily, Lessig's assignment for the Obama Administration is to root out Congressional corruption so I can imagine an infusion of cash for the project from the public sector, offsetting some corporate control. Plus, wasn't there that woman soliciting pledges to continue her coverage?

I wonder where I heard that used before?

Nov. 25 2008 02:24 AM

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