March 13, 2009

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Friday, March 13, 2009

Two political media memes, one from the right and one from the left; a newspaper that's actually thriving; and do security threats online mean we need a whole new internet?

Meme Watch

Two political memes ran through the media this week: one from the right about President Obama being a socialist, and one from the left about Rush Limbaugh leading the Republicans. We asked Northwestern University Professor Andrew Koppelman, Politico reporter Ben Smith ...

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A Shrug Goodbye

Many newspapers are struggling for survival, but do people really care if they lose their daily paper? A new poll by the Pew Research Center says ... not really. PRC President Andrew Kohut gives us a quick overview of the results.

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Secret Success

Ethnic papers are often left out of the discussion when it comes to the death of the newspaper industry. And so it came as a surprise to us that the nation's oldest Spanish language paper, El Diaro La Prensa, is actually thriving. El Diaro executive editor Alberto Vourvoulias explains why.

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Leak Proof

The site Wikileaks posts leaked documents from anonymous whistleblowers worldwide, even if those documents pose a danger or could potentially lead to loss of life. Julian Assange, the site's investigations editor, explains why Wikileaks publishes almost anything it receives.

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Letters

Brooke and Bob read some letters, comments and corrections.

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The Net’s Mid-Life Crisis

The basic architecture of the Internet hasn't changed since it was conceived 40 years ago. But what was once the playground of wonks is now the main staging area for the global economy and open to an array of security vulnerabilities. Brooke talks with Internet experts who ponder a vexing ...

Comments [17]

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