So Long, We Barely Looked Things Up in Ye

Friday, April 10, 2009

Transcript

Microsoft recently announced that they’re pulling the plug on Encarta, their once mighty encyclopedia software. Tom Corddry, who was part of the team that created Encarta, talks about designing the first digital encyclopedia, the surprising backroom negotiations that surrounded its launch, and plastic that smells like leather.

Comments [3]

Geo8rge from Brooklyn

the seeds of Wikipedia's "doom" have already been planted.

But will they sprout? For WP to die, something has to replace it. The only thing out there might be google. As far as vandalism goes, I remember the print encyclopedias at the library, with pages ripped out and pornographic scrawls here and there. I do think a professionally edited encyclopedia could sell, the problem is that they won't admit that reading an article on George Washington is probably worth about $0.00001 .

Apr. 14 2009 12:38 PM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

Oh, yes, I almost forgot. Wasn't it this segment where you mentioned "doing your preparations for the interview"? Good line and point taken.

They just aren't always the ones listeners wish or expect you to make.

Apr. 12 2009 06:31 AM
chuck thompson from Anchorage, AK

If law-school professor Eric Goldman is to be believed, the seeds of Wikipedia's "doom" have already been planted.

The Publicradio program "Future Tense" ran a story back in February wherein the good professor contended that Wikipedia is faced with going one of two directions -- less "wiki" content editing v. more rampant hacker invasions -- and choosing either route will result in the ultimate demise of Jimmy Wale's good intentions.

REF: http://www.publicradio.org/columns/futuretense/2009/02/law-professor-a.html

Apr. 12 2009 02:27 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.