Court and Spark

Friday, May 29, 2009

Transcript

With the choice of Federal Judge Sonia Sotomayor for the US Supreme Court this week the machinery of advocacy groups, pro and con, was sparked into action. Defying and supporting a supreme court nominee has become a veritable cottage industry for these groups and for the next six weeks we’ll watch them stir up public opinion and the press. Lawyer Tom Goldstein, founder of ScotusBlog, says any High Court nominee is but fuel for the politics industry.

Comments [5]

Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

I recently joined a Facebook group in support of Yale Law Prof. Harold Koh as appointee to a position as Obama's legal advisor but have become disenchanted by the more and more frequent calls to make phone calls of support to key legislative leaders. It sure seems like more of gift to AT&T more than to Obama or Koh.

Politics has become big business and it is no wonder, given its bent to be in bed with business, that a politic leader has called for a Supreme Court appointee with empathy for the vast majority of us who are not in business, unlike say Joe the Plummer.

Jun. 03 2009 09:34 PM
Jesus Monroy from Menlo Park

"Not somebody who has set their hair on fire to ..."
http://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/ROFLAO

Jun. 01 2009 02:30 AM
IW from New York

Just a further thought about raison d'etre to pass along to Bob: The phrase means 'reason for being.' If you're going to adapt it for other reasons, use 'raison' -- not 'd'etre,' which simply means 'to be' or 'for being.'

May. 31 2009 10:17 AM
chuck thompson from Anchorage AK

Ha!
I was just thinking to myself "Hmm.... fundraising d'être, that's a new one" when Bob copped a plea about the term.

May. 31 2009 01:38 AM
Kahlid from Philly, PA

Tom Goldstein would have been my choice, I guess there is a one "bow-tie" limit on the Court :0

May. 29 2009 10:17 PM

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