A Higher Power

Friday, November 06, 2009

Transcript

While there were only a handful of U.S. unmanned aerial drones in 2003, there are now some 7,000 that the military relies on for many of its objectives in Afghanistan and Pakistan. But P.W. Singer, author of Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century explains that these robots are hardly risk-free and have a profound impact both at home and abroad.

    Music Playlist
  • Pick Up (Four Tet remix)
    Artist: Bonobo

Comments [6]

geo8rge from Brooklyn NY

Is that woman claiming to be suffering from Post Virtual Traumatic Stess Disorder. While I understand her feelings, I pretty much draw the line at virtual injuries.

Nov. 09 2009 10:48 PM
Sequitur

The summary paragraph above contains the phrase "unmanned aerial drones." A tautological twofer: both "unmanned" and "aerial" are redundant.

Nov. 07 2009 08:08 PM
talat from Alanya, Turkey

Since "the war or terror" started on Sept. 11 2002, eight years and counting.
I am always surprised how Americans are toping themselves on depravity.
Even Hitler's Nazi's did not go "on air" and describe how they killed.
"War Porn" another US made New culture..
(Mr.)K. Talat Muskara

Nov. 07 2009 11:39 AM
Hal Doran from Ottawa, Canada

Small point with your guest ID: it's the Brookings "Institution", not "Institute".

Nov. 07 2009 10:09 AM
Not a Chance

I'm sure many Americans will be surprised by the parallel cost of such tragedies abroad.

Nov. 07 2009 09:51 AM
Not a Chance

Perhaps after airing a story about the families affected by the tragedy at Fort Hood, some of the media outlets should air a story about families affected by the hundreds of civilians killed collaterally in one of these drone missions.

Nov. 07 2009 09:48 AM

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