Book It

Friday, November 27, 2009

Transcript

Too many books, not enough profits. That is the lament of many publishers these days. Plus, there's the fear and loathing engendered by e-books. So, what is the state of the book industry and what can we expect in the coming years? Brooke takes a look at the present and future of books.

Comments [17]

David Palmer from Albuquerque, NM

Reading from paper and listening to someone reading are both rich experiences which take all kids some time to learn how to maximize. In today's multiplexing world listening has advantages when commuting or working in with your hands (garden, kitchen). But perhaps the best advantage to listening is to hear the accents and emphasis that the author intended. Some of us just don't know the many subtle class and geographic accents of Britain in the 19th century until the talented reader enlightens us.

Dec. 12 2009 02:39 PM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

For Gilke, no!

Another obvious way many authors profit from their books are the movie rights! Now, Kesey actually had One Flew Over The Cuckoos' Nest produced as a play, first, and Douglas (Kirk, that is) bought the movie rights and held them long enough for young Michael to make his mark as a director with the film. So, selling rights for a play version is another possible revenue stream.

Dec. 04 2009 02:56 AM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

For Gilke, no!

Another obvious way many authors profit from their books are the movie rights! Now, Kesey actually had One Flew Over The Cuckoos' Nest produced as a play, first, and Douglas (Kirk, that is) bought the movie rights and held them long enough for young Michael to make his mark as a director with the film. So, selling rights for a play version is another possible revenue stream.

Dec. 04 2009 02:56 AM
scott from Colombia

The Moxy Fruvous track is earlier. I too, am wondering what the piano/drum track at the end of the "Man Who Loved Books Too much" is.

Also, something that came to mind while hearing this story made me think about the essay "Art in the Age of Mechanical Repoduction," and made me wonder if John Gilke would have been just been just as satisfied to have a paperback library of all these literary 'treasures.' Is their value in their content, or in their container?

Dec. 03 2009 05:41 PM
Jen

When will the transcript be posted, please?

Dec. 01 2009 09:18 AM
Andi Newton

The song that's played in this is "My Baby Loves a Bunch of Authors" by Moxy Fruvous:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Baby_Loves_a_Bunch_of_Authors

It's long been a favorite of mine. :)

Nov. 30 2009 05:08 PM
Sara Reyes from Texas

Great story, I listened to all the segments and learned a bit about perceptions within the publishing business. I agree with Gaiman that in the future authors may make money going out and doing readings to readers. This past week I saw Clive Cussler at Bass Performance Hall with a couple of thousand other readers, almost ALL of us bought at least one copy and most multiple copies of Cussler's books. Even though he didn't read, it was a once-in-a-lifetime experience to hear him. Brought the years of reading Dirk Pitt back with brilliance.

Tomorrow night I go and hear Garrison Keillor who I've adored for years. Ditto on this experience, seeing in person. I know a couple of hundred (only 250 books were allotted) people paid $35 to see Palin when they could have bought the book online for $9. It's that reaching out and connection between readers and authors that's so important. It will be interesting to see what the price points would be. Would it be a free appearance with selling of books there? Would it be ticketed appearance/show?

As for the one podcast about the booksellers, OMG could they have been any more elitist? What the hay? It's a dirty thing to buy a book at a box store? Get a grip, please! And only those with lots of disposable money buy books? I think not, for some the escape into a good book gets many out of the harsh realities of day-to-day life. A little fantasy never hurts! Of course a $30 cover price does hurt.

One thing you missed is the growing trend of authors to hold in-person conferences or gatherings. They can get 100 to thousand fans to pay money to spend a day or weekend with a favorite author and fellow reader fans.

Nov. 30 2009 01:50 AM
Jerry from MN

As a bookseller, I feel the business is healthy, but more complicated. More books being published, harder to reach readers, what is the solution? the hard part is figuring out which books I can sell and which ones I can't. I'm bullish on the future of books, I just hope I can survive to be a part of it.

Nov. 29 2009 04:28 PM
David from New York, New York

Help!
Help!!
I missed your show by a few minutes.
I am trying to listen to it now.

How can I hear this show on books,
"book it."

Nov. 29 2009 04:17 PM
jen from New York, NY

Me too, that piece at the end of the segment on The Man Who Loved Books Too Much was so familiar but I can't place it, anyone know what it was?

Nov. 29 2009 03:43 PM
jen from New York, NY

Me too, that piece at the end of the segment on The Man Who Loved Books Too Much was so familiar but I can't place it, anyone know what it was?

Nov. 29 2009 03:43 PM
Robin Hillyer Miles from Memphis TN

Can you tell me the song played inbetween takes on this show?

Nov. 29 2009 02:01 PM
Tu Packard from Media, PA

It's actually much easier to read or listen to a book these days. I download audio books online both from my library and from commercial sellers. It's no longer necessary to curl up with a book. I can listen while walking, driving to work, washing dishes, cooking, and puttering about. So my "book consumption" has gone way up! What do I listen to? Great books by Dostoyevsky, Balzac, Henry James, Flaubert, Jane Austen. Also not so great books (but fun and amusing) by current popular writers. My guess is that there are many book lovers out there like me. So don't just track through standard measures; look at number of audio books downloaded from libraries. as well.

Nov. 29 2009 11:19 AM
alan from Austin, TX

Bob Stein's vision is a dreary one, and similar to what I often hear, since I'm in the IT field. New technologies are not necessarily a panacea. Do we really need personal helicopters and ubiquitous lightweight books?

Paper is good. Paper is good!

Nov. 29 2009 10:33 AM
Gianni Lovato from Chatham, NY

This week's issue of OTM gave me multiple reasons to rejoice. Perhaps "books" might be ebbing in the form to which we have become accustomed; but there are also reliable indications that reading and writing is actually undergoing a renaissance of sorts.
Unfortunately, while I rejoice at possibilities so fantastic as to be almost unconceivable, I also personally regret belonging to a generation that has difficulty grasping the full import of what is happening around us and its potential for the good of mankind.
Alongside with the dangers and inconveniences inherent in any technological development, I strongly believe that anything that contributes to removing any barrier to the imparting, distribution and acquisition of knowledge can only be ultimately beneficial to the human race.
My other regret is that I will not live long enough to see some of the most positive results of these technologies.

But how can complain? I have already been living in very interesting times: my iPod is as good as any traditional book at bed time...and I don't even have to worry about switching off the light!

Thank you for a wonderfully interesting and stimulating hour of listening to the RADIO, another medium whose demise has been grossly exaggerated.

Nov. 29 2009 10:31 AM
Nazanin Rafsanjani from New York, NY

We post the transcripts by Monday afternoon. Check back in a couple of days.

Thanks,
Nazanin
OTM Producer

Nov. 29 2009 08:22 AM
Jyr Jian Lin from Taipei, Taiwan

Why is the transcript unavailable? Please recover this service/function, thanks!

Jyr

Nov. 28 2009 02:33 AM

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