Played Out

Friday, March 12, 2010

Transcript

Recorded music might be easier than ever to get for free, but seeing live music is getting more and more expensive. Veteran concert promoter John Scher says this is due to a decade of consolidation. He says not only does it hurt fans who can’t afford tickets that ultimately it’s an unsustainable model.

Comments [3]

Taylor Oliphant

If concerts were promoted properly, and the patrol of illegal ticket buying was regulated more, the artist and ticker master could make much more money but still continue to have lower prices. If the fine/jail time for the people selling illegal tickets was a bit harsher, many more people wouldnt buy or sell illegal tickets... thus meaning the prices wouldnt have to be as high.

Mar. 31 2011 07:03 PM
Brianna Okamoto from raleigh

If ticker master or live nation could regulate who collects the ticket, and controls scalpers they would earn a lot more revenue. More people would be forced to buy directly from Ticketmaster and they could set what ever prices they desired, instead of a scalper charging 5x times the original ticket price.

Jan. 13 2011 12:56 PM
Karol Franco from Southeast Raleigh High - Raleigh, North Carolina

Prince Royce's "Corazon Sin Cara" is a great example of a popular song that most of my friends know but have never bought because of YouTube. By the way he is performing tomorrow night here in Raleigh, NC. The tickets are $65.00 which is not worth the four or five songs he will probably perform. I'm not sure he cares about his fans with prices that ridiculous.

Dec. 09 2010 11:45 PM

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