June 4, 2010

« previous episode | next episode »

Friday, June 04, 2010

The Coast Guard, BP, and media access to the Gulf oil spill; Al Qaeda's #3 man killed! (again); a illustrated book tells the gruesome story of the US-Mexico border drug war

Media Encounter Access Problems While Covering the Oil Spill

A handful of media outlets have reported that their reporters were denied access while trying to cover the oil spill in the Gulf, leaving some journalists worried that BP is deciding where they can and can't go. Times-Picayune photojournalist Ted Jackson recounts his access ...

Comments [4]

The Worst Job at Al Qaeda

This week U.S. officials announced that they’d killed Al Qaeda’s number three operative, who went by the nom de querre Sheikh Saeed al-Masri. The U.S. military has a seemingly impressive record of eliminating #3s - some argue it's been done ten times. So what gives? Slate ...

Comments [2]

The Role of Video in Israeli Blockade Crisis

The confrontation between the Israel Defense Forces and a ship of activists bringing supplies to Gaza left nine civilians dead. Each side is accusing the other of having started it and each has video to bolster their claims. New York Times digital media reporter Brian Stelter ...

Comments [16]

Criticizing Israel, Outside of Israel

In a much-discussed essay in the New York Review of Books this month, journalist Peter Beinart argues that groups like the American Israel Public Affairs Committee and the Anti-Defamation League squelch criticism on these shores by regarding critics of Israel as enemies of Israel. Beinart and Steven Rosen, ...

Comments [63]

The Longest Day

In 1959, a reporter named Cornelius Ryan published The Longest Day, about the June 6, 1944 invasion of Normandy known as D-Day. In the Columbia Journalism Review this month, author Michael Shapiro argues that Ryan’s book, now largely forgotten, was nothing short of revolutionary.

Comments [5]

Dreamland: The Way out of Juarez

Charles Bowden has been covering the story of Juarez, Mexico for well over a decade. The city is intimately linked to the drug trade, meaning violence and corruption reign, but Bowden felt the full scope of the problem wasn't being told. In his latest project,

Comments [5]

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.