The Jingle Contest Resolved

Friday, July 30, 2010

Transcript

Present and future business models for monetizing the newspaper industry has a new theme song, as decided by you (or someone like you who decided to vote). Brooke announces the winner.

Comments [9]

bryan levi from seattle, WA/albuquerque, NM

Haven't missed an episode of OTM for years...
The old jingle is terrible for too many reasons to list, and the new ones are all as terrible or slightly less terrible.
I am very surprised that you are letting just one person make the jingles to pick from. This is so weird and limiting, and they all kinda sound the same.
Wouldn't it be much more fun- and much more modern- to crowdsource this to your audience? I am guessing that the musically inclined people who listen to this show could come up with something far better than what this one guy keeps hacking out. And the audience would probably like it waaaaaaaay better.
I know I would.
-b

Feb. 02 2011 01:09 PM
Lola Von Zeplin from Brooklyn, NY

OTM's new newspaper jingle... Tells you a lot about your listeners (on Facebook at least). In spite of lyrics which literally invoke innovation and change, the selected jingle clings to a comfortable simpler time. It's country, folksy, and sounds like a one man band.

This alone, makes makes me worry for the future of the newspaper industry. If they can't get behind a jingle that evokes a modern sound, how can they support the behemoth effort it will take to evolve the industry?

Aug. 16 2010 09:33 PM
Gregory Block from London

Wow, you get an awful lot of hate mail. What crawled up their arse and died?

Given the morbidity of the subject - the doom and gloom of impending doom from the newspaper industry, it's good to hear a bit of levity.

Don't change a thing.

Aug. 08 2010 05:11 AM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

Yay, Tin Foil!

Dumb, Doc Herbert! Dumber, Doc Herbert!!

Aug. 05 2010 08:54 PM
TinFoil

Oy! I've been hanging with you guys even though you haven't had any really interesting press criticism for several months. Instead of airing this silly jingle, why aren't we talking with Charlie Pierce about his new book, discussing how Briedbart derailed the fourth estate not once but twice with verifiable baloney, or PBS's recent George Shultz love-fest funded by his pals at "free to choose media"? Seems there's plenty of Press watching to do. There's no need for this jingle. The camp humor was worn out months ago, now its just irritating. Lets get back to business, shall we?

Aug. 02 2010 05:37 PM
Doc Herbert from Minneapolis

A few minutes ago I stumbled onto your report on Henry Luce and Briton Hadden, which I found interesting. (Albeit hardly news to those of us who attended the University of Minnesota J-school, where Hadden is deified.)

Then you played the "jingle" chosen for one of your segments. It is so ineffably moronic that I have vowed never again to listen to your network or the public radio station (KNOW-FM) carrying it.

Aug. 01 2010 05:22 PM
Gary Herbert Knutson from Minneapolis

A few minutes ago I stumbled onto the local public radio station carrying your report about Henry Luce, whch I found interesting.

Then you played this new "jingle," which is so ineffably moronic that I have vowed never to visit your network or the station carrying it again.

Aug. 01 2010 05:06 PM
chascates

I'll always listen in but I'll just hit the mute button when the new jingle comes on. Sorry, but it was my LEAST favorite of the new choices!

Jul. 31 2010 12:53 PM
Ray Gleason from My car

Can I ask why you need a jingle at all? What about this story is so amusing? I know three former journalists who were homeless for long stretches in 2008 and 2009. I was one of them. Hilarious. Brooke, have you had any miscarriages we can write jingles about? Why wasn't there a jingle when Dan Schorr died? That cracked me up.

Do stories. Please leave the insensitivity to cable TV networks.

Jul. 31 2010 08:12 AM

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