September 17, 2010

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Friday, September 17, 2010

A Tea Party primary, media self-monitoring and Hollywood's accent problem

A Tea Party Primary

Karl Rove’s criticism of Christine O’Donnell ignited the political media this week. It also ignited the Twittersphere and other social media, which play a pivotal role in the Tea Party movement. Ken Vogel of Politico describes the landscape of what has been called hashtag politics, and ...

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For Some, An Apology Offends

Last week, the Portland Press Herald of Portland, Maine, published an apology to its readers that read, in part, "Many saw Saturday's front-page story and photo regarding the local observance of the end of Ramadan as offensive, particularly on the day, September 11, when our nation and the ...

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Is the Internet Making us Smarter?

As people have become more and more dependent on the Internet, some have concerns that all that information (and the devices that help us connect to it) could be doing seriously damage to the way we think, interact and learn. But Nick Bilton, lead writer for the New ...

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Monitoring Our Media Diet

Imagine if at the end of each day you received a summary of every item of food you consumed, its contents and where it came from. Now imagine the media equivalent. Ethan Zuckerman, senior researcher at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, wants to track his "personal information flow." ...

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After Haystack: Speech and Privacy Online

Last week on this show, Evgeny Morozov voiced his concerns about Haystack, software that purported to be a circumvention, encryption and steganography tool for Iranian activists online. The software hadn't been peer-reviewed but that didn't stop the media, including us, from giving it (and its creator) ...

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Foreign Speech in American Cinema

One of Hollywood’s greatest conundrums is how to represent foreign speech in American films. Film makers have come up with a variety of creative ways to depict foreign languages. Eric Hynes, film critic for Slate.com, says that the way a foreign language is depicted in a film can fundamentally alter ...

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