Is the Internet Making us Smarter?

Friday, September 17, 2010

Transcript

As people have become more and more dependent on the Internet, some have concerns that all that information (and the devices that help us connect to it) could be doing seriously damage to the way we think, interact and learn. But Nick Bilton, lead writer for the New York Times Bits Blog, explains in his new book that he's lived his whole life connected and managed to turn out just fine. He says scientific research backs up his experience.

Comments [7]

limin from itanagar

Another drawback to selling on eBay is the costs associated with doing so. Lately, eBay has redone their fee structure, regularly to raise their costs. Although these costs are still considered relatively low, they could put a damper on your profits, which alone are sometimes hard to come by. Naturally, there are ways you can the most out of eBay fees.

Jan. 05 2011 08:07 AM
limin from itanagar

Another drawback to selling on eBay is the costs associated with doing so. Lately, eBay has redone their fee structure, regularly to raise their costs. Although these costs are still considered relatively low, they could put a damper on your profits, which alone are sometimes hard to come by. Naturally, there are ways you can the most out of eBay fees.

Jan. 05 2011 08:06 AM
Regis from NJ

This person makes broad statements that show he is very shallow as he equates a learning experience such as the devastation and human misery from War and Peace to someone sitting in a safe and air conditioned environment playing a safe distraction like a philosopher, far removed from human experience. Imagine if he were supposed to describe to parents potty training--he would be clueless and this is so with his other assumptions. Like an unwanted video game, please never waste our time with this fool again.

Sep. 20 2010 07:43 PM
Charles from Seattle

Although I tend to agree with Bilton that we're not harming ourselves, I also agree with Robert Fasso. This was a story ripe for the opportunity to explore the other side's evidence and research. Right or wrong, I'd love to have heard it.

Mark, have you played any of those games? I have just a bit and can tell you that they feel as complex to me as any of the world's "great" novels. These games take concentration, critical thinking, imagination and skill to play well and understand. As a member of Gen X and a non-video game player (and avid book reader), I'd say that you should give video games the props they sometimes deserve.

Sep. 20 2010 12:25 PM
Mark Cheney from San Diego

Defend them at all costs, indeed. To suggest that playing a world war 2 video game is equivilent to reading a book on the subject is just nuts.

Sep. 19 2010 11:27 PM
Robert Fasso from Seattle

I wish they had used this time to have Nick Bilton engage with others who have a different viewpoint. I found this coverage to be biased and manipulative. Bilton pulled out the old "generational perspective" argument, which is designed to shut thought down rather than advance it. The tactic is to try to paint your opponent as an old fogey. Ironically, this tactic is itself old and shopworn. It is difficult to conclude much from a piece like this. It seems both sides in the debate (though only one was represented here) are cherry-picking the research they like.

Sep. 19 2010 09:59 PM
sean from usa

It is always just a matter of perspective, some have a utopian view of new technology and some a dystopian. It seems like most people just love the convenience and excitement of new technologies so they therefore defend them at all costs.

Sep. 19 2010 02:07 PM

Leave a Comment

Email addresses are required but never displayed.