The Social Inbox

Friday, November 19, 2010

Transcript

Last week, Facebook rolled out a new service called Facebook Messages, described by Business Week as "nothing less than a revolutionary bid to make Facebook our personal communications hub." But Dan Gillmor, of the Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship, says the prospect of any company capturing his identity online is "not just disturbing, but dangerous."

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Comments [6]

Michael Baker II

Facebook has a legit reason for why it is adding more and more things to its website. First off it has to compete with other networking sites such as myspace, bebo, and the rapidly growing myspace. It is also dangerous for people to get involved with these issues but at the same time their taking their own risk at getting involved so its up to the user to determine what they are willing to show on international websites such as Facebook.

Dec. 09 2010 10:16 AM
Bacchus Grant

I agree that this is a bit dangerous but I think that he needs to do whatever he can because their are other Social Networking sites such as twitter that he has to compete with. So maybe he feels like the other sites are doing better than him so he must do more.

Dec. 01 2010 02:09 PM
Imani Blaize from Raleigh

Facebook is now having to compete with Twitter and this is why I think they are adding more and more to their website. I don't think Facebook should allow anonymous users to be members of Facebook, that isn't the point of facebook at all .

Dec. 01 2010 08:54 AM
MrJM from Chicagoland

Whether to entrust your email to Facebook or Google is answered by their respective business models.

Facebook's utility is derived from use of an individual's particularized data, i.e. friends, connection and interests. Facebook's value is premised on the collection and sharing of that personally identifiable data. I'm asked who my friends are, I'm told who possible friends might be, I'm encouraged to connect and share with these friends (and by extension Facebook). That shared data is useful to Facebook solely because it is individualized and particularized, i.e. it's my data and identified as such. A Facebook with anonymous users would be a very different (and much less valuable) thing. Facebook is about Who is connected to Who is connected to Who, etc.

cont...

Nov. 21 2010 12:30 PM
MrJM from Chicagoland

cont...

By contrast, Google collects my data to maintain and improve its domination of "internet search". Google collects my data to make their searches more accurate, useful and generally better for everyone. My data is useful to improving Google's search function even when it is stripped away from my identity, e.g. Google makes money with my data without identifying that data as mine. To Google the How of your data is much more valuable than the Who.

Bottom line: Google's business model lets them grow and make money without maintaining an individual and identifiable dossier of activities on the web. FB's business model for growth and making money REQUIRES them to maintain an individual and identifiable dossier of my web activities.

IMHO, Google's business model makes them inherently more trustworthy than Facebook

MrJM

Nov. 21 2010 12:30 PM
David from New York

You need better counter point to address this issue. Fairly speaking, his generation won't be the ones employing most of the technology that's going to come out of this decade.

Nov. 21 2010 10:28 AM

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