Reporting from Detroit

Friday, November 19, 2010

Transcript

Earlier this year, seven-year-old Aiyana Stanley-Jones was killed while sitting on her couch by a stray police bullet during a midnight raid. Some have suggested that the raid was overly aggressive, and that officers may have been influenced by a reality TV crew that was following them that night. Journalist Charlie LeDuff, who wrote about the case for Mother Jones, talks about covering Detroit for the past several years.

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Comments [15]

devin burch

Detroit has never been a very safe place. I think this is a terrible loss in Detroit , this shows that you never know what could happen no matter how old or young you are.

Dec. 09 2010 09:04 AM
Linda Onuorah from North Carolina

It is evident that the city of Detroit can be listed as one of the most unsafe places to live. The death of the young girl is a pity of course, but this is just one of the many cases of police injustice. The police department seems to be allowed to get away with more and more disturbing crimes, with only a mere slap on the wrist. Further investigation should be conducted, and I personally feel as though these officers should be stripped of their badges.

Dec. 07 2010 10:23 PM
Quentin "Trillsz" Morgan

I have never heard about Detroit being a place of peace. I feel as if the little girl that was victim to this shouldnt have been. Because of police carelessness someone was killed . The whole police department sholuld go into investigation and the department should evaluate their employes before hiring them.

Dec. 06 2010 09:43 AM
Gabby A

I don't think I like the fact that this guy was a journalist for two years before he finally realized that a good journalist reports stories to get to the bottom of things that matter...not to "amuse" people (and himself) with "freakshow" occurances...

Dec. 02 2010 04:51 AM
Imani Blaize from Raleigh

I think that this story is pure ridiculous . The fact that the cameras were on the scene caused the cops to react unnecessarily resulting in the girls death. Journalist and news reporters are using this as a publicity stunt of some sort , just looking for the next good story .

Dec. 01 2010 08:59 AM
Danesha Poteat

Detroit is know for a terrible place, and from the past mistakes that has happen there. In the death of Aiyana Stanley-Jones I don't think its fair for her family to have to suffer from a missed loved one. I feel as if the whole police dept. should be set under investigation and whom ever was involved in it should not be allowed to work anymore. Yes mistakes happen everyday but I don't think that killing someone should.

Nov. 30 2010 07:13 PM
Danesha Poteat

Detroit is know for a terrible place, and from the past mistakes that has happen there. In the death of Aiyana Stanley-Jones I don't think its fair for her family to have to suffer from a missed loved one. I feel as if the whole police dept. should be set under investigation and whom ever was involved in it should not be allowed to work anymore. Yes mistakes happen everyday but I don't think that killing someone should.

Nov. 30 2010 07:13 PM
Dominique Jackson from Raleigh, NC

Many of things have been said about the city of Detroit, much of which is not positive in any manner. The fact that an innocent child was slain by the people that are supposed to protect her only hurts the city more.

Nov. 29 2010 01:06 PM
D.Winters

I hate how Aiyana Stanley-Jones has to be the example of how officers dont think their decisions through. Its unfair that a little girl paid the price of an officer's mistake. I feel as though, this should open the eyes of many police departments to look into their officers and make any effort to improve their department. Detroit might be an unsafe city, but I though the police were there to help not harm, or was I mistaken ? Yes, everyone makes mistakes, but killing an innocent child SHOULDNT BE ONE !

Nov. 28 2010 07:44 PM
Collins

I dont understand why the Police would escalate violence at all nevertheless this. Sure detroit isnt the most culminating of all cities, but the law enforcement should be helping the city, not extirpating it..

Nov. 27 2010 03:39 PM
Diamonique White

Although Detroit is a place that has a bad name, it has room for change. From the story about the young girl Aiyana Stanley-Jones her innocent death wasn't meant to be. I feel as if the police of Detroit shouldn't have tried to make a bigger scene than it was. They were looking for a murder suspect, they didn't know that the father was the murderer. Her death wasn't meant to be. I think other town should be more careful when it comes to violence.

Nov. 23 2010 08:25 AM
Robbin O

detriot is actually listed as one of the county most unsafe cities. For a child to become a victim of officers who do not think they're decisons through is unacceptable. The whole police dept needs to be under investigation, and all officers involved should be fired .

Nov. 21 2010 10:53 PM
Mr.Bill from Chicago, IL

Charles LeDuff is dead on- Detroit is the epicenter of the economic collapse that our nation must come to terms with. Any corruption of local officials pales in comparison with that of financial sector that now own 40% of our economy. Banks have abdicated all responsibility for too-easy mortgages for unqualified buyers, to pawn off onto unsuspecting investors after buffing them up with investment ratings, and then insuring the whole sorry mess against itself through derivatives through AIG and others that paid off as their bad deals went bust. This is the biggest scam in the history of our country's financial markets, a fraud on our very economic system, where the perpetrators of the fraud are the only ones who haven't suffered - indeed they are laughing all the way to the bank. Our court system can't even foreclose on homes because not even the banks know who really owns the mortgages- so now they are trying to wipe clean the evidence by foreclosing with robo-signers filing fraudulent affidavits before robo-foreclosure courts against absent homeowners, and our $6 trillion housing market hangs in the balance.

Poor communities were the first to bear the brunt of fraudulent lending practices ten years ago- but raising their voice they are labeled "activists" with an "agenda". If people had been asking these questions sooner, as LeDuff wanted to in 2007, or as advocates against predatory lending had been trying to do since at least 2002 (falling on the deaf ears of an uninterested media), we may have avoided this catastrophe. Too many Americans have fallen asleep thinking that politics don't affect them. But as LeDuff said, it isn't just funny anymore. Instead of confusing the symptoms (bailouts) with the causes (out-of-control financial sector and non-existent regulation), we need to educate ourselves and demand action. Some problems are too big and too complex to fit into soundbites and bottom-screen news-tickers.

Nov. 20 2010 06:02 PM
AntiTP

Nice one, Tea Party. Way to ignore the globalized economy and neoliberal economics in your analysis of Detroit's decline. Shows just how you folks do your reasoning in a reality-free vacuum.

Great segment. Charlie LeDuff is a legend

Nov. 20 2010 01:26 PM
Just a Thought

Quite right in saying "Detroit has been a mess for at least half a century" and that did not happen by accident. The primary "lazy narrative" of blaming the auto companies is misguided but fifty years ago is when the political landscape of Detroit changed. It went from a business friendly local government that supervised the literal engine of the world economy and then quickly degenerated into a "progressive" city where the seductive lure of the "Great Society" and "War on Poverty" programs discouraged business and increased corruption, crime and poverty to an almost irreparable degree. Tragically not only is Detroit not learning from their mistakes like New York City reluctantly did 15 years ago but whole states today like California seem destined to hit economic bottom before the electorate rethink "lazy narrative" political habits. Thanks

Nov. 19 2010 06:43 PM

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