December 10, 2010

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Friday, December 10, 2010

A group of hackers known collectively as "Anonymous" have been launching online attacks against the perceived enemies of WikiLeaks

Hacktivists Wage Cyberwar on Behalf of WikiLeaks

Hackers known collectively as "Anonymous" have been launching online attacks against the perceived enemies of WikiLeaks. Daily Beast writer Brian Ries explains who is behind Anonymous, who they're targeting, and how they are pulling off these attacks.

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Government Agencies Block WikiLeaks

The Library of Congress announced this week that it blocked its employees from accessing WikiLeaks. Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists' Project on Government Secrecy, says that blocking government analysts from accessing information that every other American can see is a bad and possibly dangerous idea.

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Wikileaks, the Law and the Press

In the days since "Cablegate" became international news, there have been a number of suggested strategies to legally punish WikiLeaks and/or Julian Assange. But each would criminalize not only WikiLeaks but news organizations, like The New York Times, that published those leaks. University of Chicago law professor Geoffrey Stone talks ...

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Do Not Track

Earlier this month, the Federal Trade Commission floated a proposal for a "Do Not Track" option for consumers to block certain online advertisers. Predictably, the measure was found wanting by the ad industry, which believes its own self-regulation is a superior approach, and by privacy advocates, who believe the FTC ...

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Barbie Video Girl

The latest incarnation of this iconic doll has a hidden video camera in her necklace and an LCD screen on her back for viewing. This week the FBI issued a warning to law enforcement officials to ensure they were aware of the toy and its technological capabilities. In their view, ...

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Wafaa Bilal's Third Eye

New York University professor Wafaa Bilal has surgically implanted a camera into the back of his head as part of a performance art piece. But Bilal’s decision to give up his own privacy is igniting concern for the privacy of those around him. He discusses his controversial project.

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Unauthorized Biography

In the hierarchy of journalistic respect, the "unauthorized biographer," we might agree, falls somewhere above the gossip columnist. How far above is a matter of debate. And author Kitty Kelley, who has sold millions such biographies, fired off an eloquent salvo in that debate recently in an essay ...

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