The Personal Impact of the Web

Friday, February 18, 2011

Transcript

This week On the Media brings you a version of our first ever live show - a look at the internet and how it's changing us. First up, what is the net doing to as individuals? Does it make us better and more connected to each other? Or does it degrade our real life social connections and leave us at the mercy of long distance bullies? Bob and Brooke hash it out, with help from psychologist Sherry Turkle, writer Conor Friedersdorf, and net researcher Lee Rainie.

Comments [31]

Brandon " The Greatest" Burroughs from IN SIDE OF THAT PLACE IN THE CITY WITHIN THE STATE THAT IS IN THE USA

I think the internet as impacting as it can be isnt demoralizing us but connecting people more. As in life you can meet some people you don't like and do like u have to interact with. Individuals that can change your life completely in seconds and can make life more enjoyable. Now consider this are there not people that you meet in life that cause other harm or make it their job to hinder happyness in a persons life. these same people are are the internet and on the streets in school and across the world. The World Wide Web is a informational educational and somtheing that can be used for many purposes but i dont think it hinders anyone any more then TV or A live person

Mar. 11 2011 12:46 PM
Brandon " The Greatest" Burroughs from IN SIDE OF THAT PLACE IN THE CITY WITHIN THE STATE THAT IS IN THE USA

I think the internet as impacting as it can be isnt demoralizing us but connecting people more. As in life you can meet some people you don't like and do like u have to interact with. Individuals that can change your life completely in seconds and can make life more enjoyable. Now consider this are there not people that you meet in life that cause other harm or make it their job to hinder happyness in a persons life. these same people are are the internet and on the streets in school and across the world. The World Wide Web is a informational educational and somtheing that can be used for many purposes but i dont think it hinders anyone any more then TV or A live person

Mar. 11 2011 12:46 PM
Brandon " The Greatest" Burroughs from IN SIDE OF THAT PLACE IN THE CITY WITHIN THE STATE THAT IS IN THE USA

I think the internet as impacting as it can be isnt demoralizing us but connecting people more. As in life you can meet some people you don't like and do like u have to interact with. Individuals that can change your life completely in seconds and can make life more enjoyable. Now consider this are there not people that you meet in life that cause other harm or make it their job to hinder happyness in a persons life. these same people are are the internet and on the streets in school and across the world. The World Wide Web is a informational educational and somtheing that can be used for many purposes but i dont think it hinders anyone any more then TV or A live person

Mar. 11 2011 12:46 PM
Dion Twayne Watson from Southside

The personal impact of the web is a very huge impact, with facebook, twitter, myspace, etc. the web has become a very big part of my life and the life of teenagers as well.

Mar. 10 2011 11:45 AM
Zachary Hinton from Southeast Raleigh Magnet High School

I really like what Brooke said " Bob, I agree, it’s horrible. But just because people act like a bunch of monsters on a message board doesn't mean that it’s the Internet that’s dehumanizing us. It just enables us to be more of who we are, anytime, anywhere, by enabling us to connect." I totally agree with this statement. The internet isn't responsible for humans acting crazy, it's responsible for humans acting crazy and everyone being able to see it now. I think the internet is a amazing yet dangerous tool that has to be treated with caution. The slightest slip up and your whole life could be in ruins.

Mar. 02 2011 08:35 PM
Alex Goldman from United States

@Sean -- you can find a link to the song (and the video) for DanandDan's facebook song on our Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=183444828359444&oid=29904868954&comments

Thanks,
Alex Goldman
Producer, On the Media

Feb. 25 2011 03:01 PM
William Hernan

The internet is a great tool for a lot of things. Like every tool though it has its good things and its bad things. Perfect example is you wouldn't use a screwdriver to put a nail in the wall or a wrench on a screw. The internet has the ability to connect every one at each other. The whole Facebook friends thing I feel is taken to seriously because people add some one as their "friend" when they only talk to them once in awhile at work or school. After that time of seeing them is up then they never talk to each other and because so many people have so many "friends" that they eventually forget all about the person.

Feb. 25 2011 01:09 PM
Sean

Only reason I came to this site was to find a link to tweet to the song, but it's nowhere to be seen - What gives?

Feb. 25 2011 07:21 AM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

First, you’d really have to dispense with the format of segments to present a cohesive live show. This was not it. Dividing it into segments straight-jacketed the whole show, forcing it to seem rushed and making the missing transitions obvious.
This was excerpts from a live, recorded set of interviews perhaps with a live audience.

Feb. 25 2011 01:35 AM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

This whole program seemed off. It is advertised as a “live” broadcast but that lie is exposed by Bob’s regular, pregnantly paused “edited by…Brooke”. Live broadcasts, real ones, aren’t edited and don’t have what sounds suspiciously like a canned laugh track.

This seemed just like all of the “debates” on this program. You control the outcome, the message the audience takes from a show or segment, by being able to choose what a guest says (or what is said that ends on the cutting room floor) and in what order, never mind that you choose topics, as well. This is acceptable in shows you promote as produced but a live program is something I don’t really believe you people could handle.

Feb. 25 2011 01:34 AM
Travion Mallette from southeast raleigh highschool

ok i see it as this the internet is a form of comunication to people all over the world keeping people informed as well as entertaing. hop off! this is our genrations blessing.

Feb. 23 2011 08:53 AM
William Stevens from Redford, MI

I, a futurist and member of the World Future Society, enjoyed the program - dare I say immensely! Brooke and Bob must have flipped a coin to determine the positions they would take - utopia or dystopia. Point-counter point, all the way through.
More "serious discussion," and "more analysis," - boring. That's not what this type of program should provide. Its role is to present the "big picture." That's all the general public will put up with. I have not been able to restrain my self and have talked briefly, that's all the people I have talked to wanted to hear. My impression was that they thought I was a bit daffy and babbling about science fiction. But no, this is not science fiction. It is the world we are living in, and the world that is coming at a faster and faster pace.
If a person wants to dig a little deeper they can read Ray Kurzweil's book's, "The Singularity Is Near When Humans Transcend Biology," "Transcend Nine Steps To Living Well Forever," and "The Age of Spiritual Machines." They can check out what the transhumanists are saying. They can take a look at the World Future Society's web site, www.wfs.org, and read their magazine "The Futurist." Of course there's a lot more out there, and through the use of an internet search engine they can receive a treasure trove of information.

Feb. 23 2011 02:26 AM
Brian from Georgia

Are you for real, a bunch of people that obviously know nothing about the web or computers and probably not much else, trying to have an intelligent conversation. I would rather listen to commercials on the country/western station than to listen to this tripe.

Feb. 22 2011 08:03 PM
Amesly

Yes, I'd love that facebook song, too!

Feb. 21 2011 11:51 PM
tiffany lee brown from portland

i'm still listening, on the east coast... i just interviewed a number of the sources being mentioned on OTM, including Sherry Turkle and Nicholas Carr (and others, like Kevin Kelly and Bruce Sterling). for Plazm magazine issue 30.

one thing they might do well to address is the number of years a user has been online, and perhaps the age at which they first got online. i notice that a lot of folks i know who, like me, got online in the late 80s and early 90s and were deeply involved in the emerging internet, are now skeptical or circumspect about our digital reality. will other people become distrustful (and bored) like us once they've had a good twenty years of constant connectivity?

Feb. 21 2011 11:19 PM
jack katz from mesa arizona, the land of legislative fruits and nuts

A fantastic show. Full of important content and still presented in a light and palatable way...respecting the intellect of your audience. Even the comments herein are civil and on-target even where they disagree.
An extraordinary feat...no?
Civil discourse...who'd ever imagine?

Feb. 21 2011 10:41 PM
Duffy Johnson from Albuquerque, NM

What a great show!! I hope there are more live shows for OTM in the very near future.

Feb. 21 2011 06:51 PM
Gina Felicetti from Brooklyn, NY

Thanks. One of my favorite OTMs. Thanks Brooke and Bob for keeping OTM moving forward and continuing to explore important and interesting topics.

Feb. 21 2011 04:52 PM
Jim

OK, guys, I appreciate your doing some live shows, but I fear you are close to "jumping the shark" as you spend a lot of time being "funny" or "flippant." What happened to the more serious discussions of media issues. Maybe I can be accused of not having a sense of humor, but Bob Garfield was just a little over the top. Maybe you should do stand up as an outside your daily job to get it out of your system.

Feb. 21 2011 10:59 AM
Francisco from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

On loneliness and the Internet, you might find this (more recent) study interesting: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8701763.stm

Feb. 21 2011 02:00 AM
Jeffz from Seattle

Nice show. I skipped my Sunday Sauna just to listen to the debate. Very brilliant and lots of good points brought up. The song is from Dan&Dan. I don't remember the name though.

Feb. 20 2011 11:30 PM
Carol

I started listening to this OTM, couldn't stand it, scrubbed the podcast to the end. Please give us straight stories, as usual, you're both funny and lively enough in them, live and unfiltered was too much.

Feb. 20 2011 07:48 PM
anon

http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2004/3/19/

Feb. 20 2011 03:26 PM
Anne Fuller from Juneau, AK

NO, Brooke, having the knowledge of the WWW is not the same as being omniscient.

I think I'd prefer to hear less sniping and a bit more analysis. Really I don't need to hear you guys tease each other and I do like the longer interviews, rather than sound bites.

And, consider taping an excellent high school or college team debate your next question.

I listen on KTOO FM

Feb. 20 2011 02:59 PM
Kathryn from New Jersey

There was an article in the NYTimes recently (1/25/11) that also said that advanced chess players used their brains differently than novice players. The pros have much more activity in certain areas. I don't think the internet is making our brains change. I think our brains change if we use them intently and focus on something specifically and become really good at it. I agree with Catherine Hale, we need both kinds of attention: hyper & deep. Kids today, at least some, do have an advantage over older adults in that their processing speed is naturally faster, due to their age; it is proven that brain processing slows down as we age. However, as a teacher (of 18 year olds & up) for 25 years, I observe that its the deep focus that kids lack, which is a possible reason that the internet is such a shallow place. I try to enable my stuents to focus more deeply, more and more these days. I try to improve my hyper attention; and I find I am good at it; so good that I sometimes confuse my contemporaries, with my fast thinking & mode switching! They don't get it. I have to repeat with more details!

Feb. 20 2011 01:07 PM
Sharon Hulings from Coupland, TX

Please tell me OTM isn't going to be like this from now on, live in studio I mean. For me it distracted so much from what I usually get from listening to this, my favorite npr program.

Feb. 20 2011 11:06 AM
scarlett from NYC

Human beings have something called free will. We CHOOse to use all these media. All these studies are sugesting that we, as thinking individuals, have no power to make a phone call, to grab a book to read? We choose to be "glued" to our computers and smart phnes.
We choose

Feb. 20 2011 10:33 AM
No name from Neither here nor there

Why was the show live? Just for fun? I enjoyed the show, but I think literacy (including computer literacy) contributed to Egypt, in particular, and their revolution. Whereas a revolution in Afghanistan is unlikely due to high illiteracy rates there. That nips the argument in the bud right there. And the fact of high unemployment in a highly educated populace, that also played a huge part in stoking the discontent, but, hey, they knew how to tweet.

And *what* is the big deal about Brooke editing the show? I still don't get that at all. Does she edit it on tape with a razor blade or use a digital workstation or what? What's the big deal, someone let us in on it.

Feb. 19 2011 04:42 PM
THE k from At work on a Saturday?!?

One of the best (and funniest) OTMs I've ever heard. Maybe I run in the wrong circles, but I usually hear this topic being discussed by stoned tech geeks in someone's basement - it was great to hear possibilities for our collective digital future dissected, albeit in relatively simple form, by sharp and clear-minded intellects. There's no way to predict the future, but conversations like these make us more aware of what's happening now, the directions in which we're currently headed. They also make us more aware of our own humanity, and that awareness will be our best defense against losing ourselves within our technology.
And yeah, please make the "Facebook Group" song available as an mp3 so I can send it to all my facebook friends

Feb. 19 2011 10:59 AM
Bobby

What was that song between the first and second segments? It was about facebook... very funny!

Feb. 19 2011 07:55 AM
Ed from NYC

Listening to Brooke confirms that I don't agree with her point of view regardless of the fact that her tone is beyond annoying. To cite that study of older people having stronger brains due to internet usage - isn't it possible that older people who use the internet already have stronger brains than older people who choose not to use the internet? Maybe that was part of the study but we'll never know; the study was never discussed beyond Brooke using results to make her point. I believe that she has conclusions first and finds facts to support her conclusions and that is her general rule for media analysis. I sense no openmindedness on her part.

Feb. 19 2011 07:23 AM

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