On the Trail of Stuxnet

Friday, March 11, 2011

Transcript

Last year, somebody somewhere – possibly a government, possibly several governments – unleashed one of the most sophisticated pieces of malware ever created, specially designed apparently to target Iran’s uranium enrichment program. In a gripping narrative in Vanity Fair, author Michael Joseph Gross follows the trail of the so-called Stuxnet virus and argues that it marks cyberwarfare’s Hiroshima moment.

Comments [4]

Chrisco from Bay Area

Wow, it is really glorifying an act of cyber war! I am sure your attitude would be the same, the same awe and wonder, if this concerned a Chinese cyber-attack on the Pentagon, for instance.

I just think the legal and can of worms aspect of this attack should have been explored a little.

Mar. 14 2011 07:26 PM
Morris Townson from US

http://www.alternet.org/story/116641/everything_you_need_to_know_about_iran_but_the_mass_media,_the_republicans_and_hillary_clinton_wouldn't_tell_you/

Everything You Need to Know about Iran But the Mass Media, the Republicans and Hillary Clinton Wouldn't Tell You
A conspiracy of myths about Iran has been pushed on us to make it seem scary. Want to hear some facts?

Yes, I want FACTS!

Mar. 13 2011 10:37 AM
mark h from United States

Interesting piece, but I would say the analogy of Hiroshima is not quite accurate....seems more like a real world test, in which case the Trinity explosion woud be a better choice of comparisons.

Mar. 12 2011 10:41 AM
Peter Petrovich from Annandale, VA

Why don't you go to the source (i.e. Ralph Landner himself) and instead perpetuate on your program some of the same inaccuracies and exaggerations that Ralph is pointing out about Mr. Gross' reporting? See Ralph's blog @ http://www.langner.com/en/2011/03/10/vanity-fair-reporter-freak-out/. Such behavior makes me think that the case of Republicans for removing your Federal funding is justified!

Mar. 12 2011 07:04 AM

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