State Run Newspapers and Mona Seif

Friday, April 15, 2011

Transcript

Al-Ahram has been an institution in Egypt for 136 years, but under Mubarek, the state run newspaper became notorious for disinformation in service of the regime. Brooke talks with Al-Ahram's staff about how to re-establish credibility in post-revolutionary Egypt. Plus, blogger and activist Mona Seif tells Brooke about the new media taboo.

Comments [3]

Calill from raleigh

I think people take the media and news for granted in America, and this situation should be a wake-up call to anyone who fully believes everything that the media says without a second thought. It IS possible for the government to control the media, and it IS possible for people to ignore some news that might make their name look bad.

May. 16 2011 10:45 AM
David Hsan

Your interview with Mona Seif left me heartened and optimistic about the future of Egypt. Hearing someone so intelligent, so pragmatic, so passionate, so engaged, and yes - so young, talk about change in her country, gave me the kind of hope that I don't get from consuming the media diet served up in this country. Before this interview I was resigned that Egypt would fall into chaos because it doesn't have a class of people who could replace the dictator and his cronies.
If young people like Mona Seif could have been produced in Egypt under Mubarak, imagine how many more can thrive and become leaders in the new Egypt.
Thank you OTM for this wonderful piece; I don't think that I would have been exposed to Mona Seif anywhere else.

Apr. 17 2011 01:20 PM
Nancy Keefe Rhodes from Syracuse, NY

This was a wonderful story! I find myself so impressed with the Egyptian young people.

Apr. 16 2011 06:47 PM

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