Tweets From Tahrir

Friday, April 22, 2011

Transcript

The new book Tweets From Tahrir is a collection of tweets sent from the epicenter of Egypt's revolution. It tells a unique story of the popular uprising that ended Hosni Mubarak's reign. Nadia Idle is one of the book’s editors. She says the book aims to capture a monumental yet fleeting moment in Egyptian history.

Comments [3]

Oscar Romero

I think it is very important for this book to be made. It not only stands as a symbol of the thoughts and feeling of the people at the time but it also portrays the seriousness of the situation. Twitter seems like a juvenile tool used to post random thoughts but when put into a book the tweets obviously mean something. It is essential for this book to be made if people want to know the actual thoughts and feelings of the victims at the time.

May. 18 2011 11:28 AM
Allan Murphy from Tokyo

Here is another example of retro-technology:
http://www.quakebook.org/
It is a book of tweets that were written on or after 2:46 pm on March 11 when Japan was hit by the huge earthquake, the tsunami, then the nuclear reactor problems. I believe all money raised will go to the Japanese Red Cross.

Apr. 30 2011 07:26 AM
Travion Mallette from Southeast Raleigh

Now, I, I still have to ask you this, cause there’s something nagging about the whole idea of printing tweets on paper, which to me is like something along the lines of taking songs off your iPod and then burning them onto a CD, or maybe even pressing them into a vinyl record. It’s retro-technological. It just - it seems like it’s, I don't know, going backwards and forwards at the same time.

Apr. 27 2011 08:04 AM

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