#14 - The Knowledge

Thursday, February 06, 2014 - 07:00 PM

(Brendan Loy)

Every year, a small group of sports fans scattered across the US play a game called "Last Man." The goal is to be the last man in America to find out who won the Super Bowl. TLDR Sports reporter Lisa Pollak followed the game this year, and found out just how hard information was to avoid in the internet age.

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Comments [17]

Gary

It is February 18 and I still have no clue who won the Superbowl.

Feb. 18 2014 01:51 PM
Francisco from Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

It strikes me that last man game is just trying to look cool by not knowing. One of my bugbears is: Why is so much of the news devoted to sport? It's not important.

The Olympics are even worse because the IOC force countries to change their laws to support the sponsors for the events (that in itself is anti-democratic (in countries that are democracies) as that wasn't spelt out to everyone, at least in the case of London, until after London won). It's even worse in countries like China and Russia because it gives a propaganda boost to despotic regimes.

Feb. 12 2014 01:55 AM
Kalli from Vancouver, WA

There was no way to play last man in WA state unless you were deaf. As soon as the game was won, people were in the streets of even the smallest neighborhoods honking their car horns and setting off fireworks.

Feb. 11 2014 04:00 PM
Mike

I thought that the seahawks was a hockey team name until last week.

Feb. 10 2014 04:24 PM
David from Oxford, MS

Like someone said elsewhere in the comments, everyone discussing the ease of #LastMan due to the fact that they don't care about the outcome doesn't understand how many times they have actually seen/heard the knowledge and immediately pushed it from their mind.

In regards to the suggestion about the presidential election: This is something that Brendan and I have discussed over twitter. The presidential election has consequences far more reaching than an arbitrary sporting event. One of the most interesting factors in my #LastMan saga was the complete unimportance of something I (and so many others) care about. Every year, the Super Bowl has more viewers, eclipsing the previous one. Why? Why do these two teams matter to so many of us? I think this is one of the reasons Lisa cared to follow our story, and I am grateful.

Feb. 10 2014 01:48 PM
Vince Lombardi

A Super Bowl ? What is it ? Never heard of that ...

Feb. 10 2014 12:21 PM
Mike

I win for all time! Not only don't I know who won the Superbowl, I don't know who won ANY Superbowl, or for that matter any grand champion sporting event of any kind! Name a year and a sport and I can't tell you which team played or won!

Feb. 10 2014 12:14 PM
mark718

Those of you who are saying it's not so hard, I'll bet your lack of knowledge is due to disinterest. I'm sure you've been exposed to the information but have just disregarded it. This becomes much harder if you actually know about the game and care about who won.

A more fun version would be the next presidential election ;)

Feb. 10 2014 11:59 AM
Brendan

It actually isn't that hard. I don't know who won. I don't care at all. I haven't seen any headlines that announced it, I haven't heard anyone talk about it. The population that actually cares isn't as large as some people seem to believe!

Feb. 10 2014 10:47 AM
Chris Bruner

Was there a superbowl?

Feb. 10 2014 10:05 AM
Dennis Velco from Columbus, Ohio

I don't even know who played. I think someone told me but football is in one ear and out the other. I could care less.
Joe, your estimate of half the world doesn't care about US Football is a very very conservative estimate. Try 90% of the world doesn't care.
But glad for those 10% who really enjoy it.

Feb. 10 2014 09:13 AM
Dennis Velco from Columbus, Ohio

I don't even know who played. I think someone told me but football is in one ear and out the other. I could care less.
Joe, your estimate of half the world doesn't care about US Football is a very very conservative estimate. Try 90% of the world doesn't care.
But glad for those 10% who really enjoy it.

Feb. 10 2014 09:12 AM
Joe

I'm pretty sure half the world doesn't even care enough to worry about being the "last to know" so they'll have to wait quite some time.

Feb. 10 2014 08:04 AM
Leshy

I could play that game. I don't even know who played in the Super Bowl.

Feb. 10 2014 07:52 AM
Kevin McKague from Davison, Michigan

I used to do this on my own, but I gave up once Twitter came around.

Feb. 09 2014 07:39 PM
Art Vandelay

Edmonton won, right?

Feb. 09 2014 02:02 PM
Ian

It was funny to hear this on an OTM-related podcast. The only sport I really follow is tennis, and the Australian Open men's final is usually played around 3 AM Eastern US time. Last year I thought if I could just avoid hearing who won, I could stream the replay of the whole thing and it'd be more or less like watching it live.

So I avoided email, Twitter, Facebook, the web, and the radio, which I usually turn on first thing Sunday morning. Our local affiliate runs OTM at 10 AM Sunday, though, and I figured it'd be safe to listen to that, so I turned on the radio then, totally forgetting about the five-minute top-of-the-hour headline news segment. Boom, death by NPR.

This year I kept that in mind, but made the mistake of turning on my phone. Boom, death by news app push notification.

Feb. 08 2014 05:44 PM

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