Calvin Trillin Looks Back on The Freedom Riders

Friday, July 22, 2011

Transcript

Covering the Civil Rights movement for Time's Atlanta bureau taught reporter Calvin Trillin some important lessons. How to report in a place where you're not liked (he says he felt 'a little like a foreign corespondent' in the South), the importance of knowing the subject (race) of your reporting very well, and the importance of not just giving every side of an argument equal weight. Brooke talked with Trillin about his piece "Back on the Bus" which will appear in the July 25 issue of the The New Yorker.

    Music Playlist
  • Mississippi Goddamn
    Artist: Nina Simone

Comments [4]

Will Coley from Santa Monica, CA

While I thought this was an interesting and timely segment, I found it amazing that you omitted discussion of the current immigrant rights movement in the US, particularly since it can also be considered a racial justice movement. By ignoring a "sphere of legitimate contraversy" and failing to "mix up" the immigration debate, perhaps "On the Media" has revealed it's own bias...

Jul. 28 2011 02:29 PM
Leslie from California

A man married another in Minnesota in 1970. Two years later, the Supreme Court refused to hear the case. I was twenty years old.

41 years later the federal court system is dragging out the time when it will eventually have to hear one of several dozen cases involving the civil rights of gays. I am 61 years old.

Isn't one generation, one person's adult lifetime, enough time to decide whether or not to affirm the principle of equality?

Goddam Mississippi and the United States of America.

Jul. 24 2011 07:10 PM
Jamie York

That's the great Nina Simone.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippi_Goddam

Jul. 24 2011 12:14 AM
rick from michigan

who sang the song "mississippi goddam" at the end of the Trillin segment?

Jul. 23 2011 09:00 AM

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