Blurry in Germany

Friday, August 12, 2011

Transcript

Since Google began taking pictures for their Google Street View service in Germany in 2008, it has been a controversial topic in the country. So controversial, in fact, that three percent of the population opted to have their homes blurred on the service, and backlash was so vicious that in April, Google abandoned the service in Germany entirely. OTM's Michael Bernstein traveled there last summer to try to understand why it was so universally reviled.

Comments [4]

Steve from Helmstedt, Germany

I am German and I think it is ridiculous that any tenant of a house can make it blurry. I can walk down the street and see it. So what is private about it? It is not as if I can zoom into a house and see the people. Also people, car license plates, etc. are already made blurry.

Aug. 26 2011 03:35 PM
Lil Ratchet from FLORIDA

UM YEAH THE SHOULD HAVE A CHOICE MAN. ITS THERE OWN CHOICE BRA LIKE REALLY THOUGH YO. LIKE IM NOT EVEN PLAYIN BRA LIKE WORD UP BRA LIKE DANG BRA.

Aug. 26 2011 07:49 AM

I'm one of those people who very much dislikes the Google Street-View: not because it shows my house, but because I suspect that tech-savvy con-men can use that image, along with a host of other personal information on the Web (information that I don't even know is out there) to dig into my business, steal my identity, empty my bank account ... all the stuff you hear about on the news. Google Street-View isn't evil per se, it's just visible and known about by the general public. It is the visible part of the iceberg of privacy-invasion.

Aug. 21 2011 04:38 PM
Noah

people should have the choice if they want to have their house shown on the google maps because some people feel like its an invasion of privacy

Aug. 18 2011 07:46 AM

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