Pew Looks At The Local News Ecosystem

Friday, September 30, 2011

Transcript

While studies have consistently shown TV news to be America’s number-one source of local information, a new Pew Study paints a far more nuanced picture of our local information ecosystem by breaking down local news into specific topics—from politics to restaurants. Brooke talks to Pew's Lee Rainie about what the study tells us.

Comments [1]

Brian from Chicago, Il

I'm disappointed in the lack of conversation about the pile of crap that local television news is. But since it has been that way forever, i suppose we have learned to accept it as trite and unimportant, certainly not as important as it seems to think it is.

In Chicago, local news is on from as early as 4:30am until 9:00 am. Then it appears again 11:00 am and noon. Then again from 4:00 pm until 6:30pm (with a half hour break for the national news) and finalizing with the nightly news 10:00pm until 10:30pm. So roughly 1/3rd of the programming day on local channels is local news, and yet the reporting is as in depth as a tea-spoon.

Once a few years ago for about a month they tried something refreshingly different with Carol Marin on the 10:00 CBS local news, but because it did not grow fast enough they snatched it from the air. They seem to have made the mistake of actually discussing the news and not just delivering it in a two-minute spit.

Meanwhile we are not even ignited by television news to even question any of the political or legislative issues that we should be presently dealing with beyond the normal trolling of stories on newspaper sites.

But thank you for even mentioning the fantastic waste of space local television news actually is.

Oct. 03 2011 04:44 PM

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