Website Tracks D.C. Homicides in Real Time

Friday, November 04, 2011

Transcript

When Laura Amico launched the website Homicide Watch D.C., her intent was to create a comprehensive record of all the murders in the District. Little more than a year later, the site has become more than a somber document for posterity: it's a bona fide newsbreaker, often identifying victims before police do.

Comments [7]

Lisa McDonald from eastern panhandle

My father was murdered in 1987... in D.C. this website I hope will help people in ways where we had very limited resources back then... awesome effort... blessings

May. 27 2013 01:18 PM
Rebecca from Boston, MA

This was a great segment! It really reinforces for me of the idea of accountability - on the part of the police, on the media and on ourselves as community members. There's a multimedia exhibit on view here in Boston about urban violence, media coverage of it and the impact anonymous comments left on news media sites have on families and communities - Anonymous Boston: http://anonymousbostonproject.com/site/. Thanks for this interview.

Nov. 18 2011 01:33 PM
Laura Amico from Washington, DC

Hi Alison. Ping me on Twitter and we'll connect. The official account is @homicidewatch and my personal account is @LauraNorton

Nov. 10 2011 05:56 PM
Alison Kinderfather from St. Louis, MO

I want to be the one to launch this in St. Louis, MO. How do I get in touch, stay connected and be involved? Thanks! AK:)

Nov. 07 2011 03:45 PM
Laura Amico from Washington, DC

Hi Joe. It's more than a full time effort! But a lot of my time goes into business development, too. We're licensing the software built for Homicide Watch to newsrooms across the United States. Homicide Watch D.C. is our test site.

Nov. 06 2011 09:57 AM
Sarah from Brooklyn

This story so interesting on multiple levels--thanks

Nov. 05 2011 01:27 PM
Joe

Sounds like a full time effort, does Laura earn a living from her blog Homicide Watch?

Nov. 05 2011 08:07 AM

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