CDC's Graphic Anti-Smoking Campaign

Friday, March 16, 2012

Transcript

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are unleashing a new ad campaign that graphically depicts the consequences of smoking. The campaign, called "Tips From Former Smokers," is the first of its kind by the federal government.  Bob speaks to CDC director Dr. Thomas R. Frieden about the new commercials.

Comments [2]

candy bee

this article is nothing to kid about. i 100% support this article

Mar. 22 2012 01:19 PM
Chris Gray from New Haven, CT

I could rhapsodize for paragraphs on simply the package design of Camel unfiltered cigarettes to which I've been addicted since about age 3 (and that's just the design) but even then it insults the intellect to hear Bob talk of reduced advertising costs for their products. Product placement has been raised to new heights with the invention of ways to get them in front of viewers eyes with programs set, at least in part, in the past.

The Big Three's attempts, Playboy Club and PanAm seem to have died already but Fox's Alcatraz is devised as a program split between modern day and 1963, just before the Surgeon Gerneral's warning and advertising restrictions, and featurers cigs as prison currency and even used in bribes and survived. Of course, there's also whole channels with old movies now. All of that pales in comparison, however, to cable's Mad Men where, as a feature on both Friday's Nightline and a Sunday evening filler on ABC's World News reminds, we are frerquently exposed to a full ash tray which actor John Hamm says has held thousands of cigarettes on our most popular t.v. show.

They don't need no stinkin' ads, they own whole shows.

Mar. 19 2012 05:08 AM

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