The Archive Team

Friday, March 23, 2012

Transcript

Most of us think nothing of putting our lives in the cloud; photos in Flickr, videos on YouTube, most everything on Facebook.  But what about when those services abruptly go away, taking all of our collective contributions with them?  Well Jason Scott operates on the assumption that everything online will one day disappear.  He explains to Bob why he and the Archive Team are dedicated to saving user-generated content for posterity.

Guests:

Jason Scott

Hosted by:

Bob Garfield

Comments [4]

Will Caxton

".... We're definitely not giving it to other businesses and selling it to them." So how is this group funded? Who pays for their resources? "... give people the option of getting some of their data back." For a price? "... there are people right now taking some of the things we download and doing cultural analysis." For a price?

How do they handle access and privacy? Can anyone who asks do "cultural analysis" on content I created? Does that include content I might have believed to be private?

Apr. 10 2012 04:33 PM
Steve MacIntyre from Greenville, Delaware

Coming soon: KodakGallery.com?

The site was originally Ofoto, which was acquired by Kodak and now seems to be on the block again with Shutterfly reportedly bidding a pittance ($23 million) for it.

I sure hope the site stays online. I've got a lot of photos stored there.

Mar. 25 2012 08:26 PM
Brewster Kahle from San Francisco

Jason Scott's and the full Archive Team (http://archiveteam.org) is doing great work and, interestingly, at Internet scale. They have collected many many terabytes of cultural materials that were being tossed.

His team has put much of it on the Internet Archive site ( http://archive.org/details/archiveteam ) and I hope they put more there. Full disclosure: I work with the Internet Archive.

-brewster

Mar. 25 2012 03:44 PM
ab43

It's great that some of us out there are committing themselves to this effort. It would have been good to have been informed in the story what role the Library of Congress has (if any) in these types of efforts and how it compares to this organizations efforts.

Mar. 25 2012 03:01 PM

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