A Ugandan Response to Kony 2012

Friday, April 27, 2012

Transcript

A group of Ugandan journalists has released their own online response to Kony 2012. Their aim is to recapture the narrative established by Invisible Children. Bob speaks to contributor Rosebell Kagumire who says the group is focusing more on Ugandans recovering from the war then on the search for Joseph Kony. 

 

Ballake Sissoko and Vincent Segal - Oscarine

Hosted by:

Bob Garfield

Comments [4]

A friend of mine was in the Peace Corps in this region many years ago. She asked many times about something I would like to ask about now, fish can be made into a powder by the WHO and then used to fortify other food.

Why do they refuse? Here is some background: Nutrition: Protein for Everybody Friday, Mar. 17, 1967 Time Magazine, Half of the world's people are undernourished, and their most crippling deficiency is in protein, the basic building block of the human body. Its lack causes mental retardation, stunted growth, early death. Now U.S. industry and Government scientists have developed an inexpensive food supplement rich in protein. It is a "flour" made by grinding up whole fish, and Interior Secretary Stewart Udall reports that it can restore balance to the diet at a daily cost of only half a cent per person. U.S. fisheries alone, he adds, can produce enough of the raw material to meet the needs of 300... OTM can do a story on this?

May. 01 2012 05:45 AM
Mike from Colorado

I found the video, which is actually called "A life without Kony," at http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=AvcWdNUujmg#!

The project's website is http://ugandaspeaks.com/

Apr. 30 2012 11:21 AM
Mike from Colorado

Yes, why is there no link to the Uganda 2012 video?? Many videos come up on a YouTube search, and it's hard to tell which is the one this story is about.

Apr. 30 2012 11:12 AM
TB from CA

would love to see the Ugandan video - where's the link?

Apr. 30 2012 09:57 AM

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