What You Hear When You Watch The Olympics

Friday, July 27, 2012

Transcript

On Atlantic.com this week Alexis Madrigal described watching sports without sound as "eating an orange when you have a stuffy nose." But how do the TV sports producers actually mic the games? Brooke speaks with Peregrine Andrews who produced a documentary called "The Sound of Sport" which details the extreme lengths sound engineers go to to make sports sound like sports.

Here's Peregrine's great blog post about his doc.

Guests:

Peregrine Andrews

Hosted by:

Brooke Gladstone

Comments [2]

Amemele

where are the sounds on this webpage

Aug. 08 2012 12:14 AM
Alfred Blitzer from New York City

Listening to this segment I was reminded of an NPR report on a winter Olympics. I had watched many of the Olympic events including the snow board half pipe event. It was interesting to watch. But NPR, after the Olympics went back to listen to the events. On NPR I was now listening to the rock music playing during the each run, the cow bells, and the screaming of the crowds. Wow this was really exciting, and I was driving my car while listening. I realized for the Winter Olympics probably more than the summer events, the networks didn't care about the sounds of the events. Since then I can't watch the Winter events anymore, they are bland and filled with the noise of the announcers as opposed the magical noise of music and crowds.

Jul. 28 2012 07:53 PM

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