The Strangest Hoax in Modern Sports History

Friday, January 18, 2013

Transcript

Until this week, Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o was famous not just for his on-field skills but for his compelling backstory, which included the tragic death of his girlfriend. This week, the sports blog Deadspin exposed that story as a massive hoax, although it is still unclear what, if any, participation Te'o had in the lie. Bob and Brooke delve into the myth and consider how it snuck by the national media. 

Hosted by:

Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone

Comments [1]

Guy VanderLek from Wilmington, DE

Sad that Manti Te'o and Lance Armstrong continue to get coverage, when a horror story related to Notre Dame Football continues to go underreported in the media.

As recently as January 17th, the Washington Post ran this online article - http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2013/01/17/a-fake-tragedy-gets-more-tears-than-a-real-one/ describing the case of Lizzy Seeburg, a real person who took her own life after accusing a Notre Dame football player of rape.

This was not just a reaction to the Te'o hox, Melinda Henneberger reported earlier December 2012 on the story - http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/she-the-people/wp/2012/12/04/why-i-wont-be-cheering-for-old-notre-dame/

That reporting came out of her original article in the National Catholic Reporter in March 2012 - http://ncronline.org/news/accountability/reported-sexual-assault-notre-dame-campus-leaves-more-questions-answers and this on a Title IX investigation by the US Department of Education - http://ncronline.org/node/29472.

Notre Dame isn't Knute Rockne, George Gipp and "Rudy" anymore, it has become an institution that suppresses complaints of sexual violence, beholding to the almighty athletic department, rather than the to following of the living deity their faith calls on them to follow.

Jan. 20 2013 12:35 PM

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