Culture and the Courts, The Legacy of Rand Paul's Filibuster, and More

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Friday, March 29, 2013

How Popular Culture Influences SCOTUS Decisions, How Rand Paul's Drone Filibuster May Have Changed Minds, and Brooke talks with the great Walt "Clyde" Frazier about sports and the media.

Do Supreme Court Rulings Reflect the Culture, or Change it?

The question of same-sex marriage landed in the Supreme Court this past week, and marriage equality supporters are hoping for a landmark ruling that will legalize same-sex marriage. If it happens, it’ll be one in a series of history-making Supreme Court rulings. But how does it work? Does the Supreme Court have the power to change the culture, or does our culture influence the decisions of the justices? NYU law professor Barry Friedman has written a book on that very question. He tells Bob that for the most part, the Supreme Court tries to shape their decisions according to what the public wants. 

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The Legacy of a Filibuster

In early March, Kentucky Senator Rand Paul used a 13-hour filibuster to draw attention to the Obama Administration's drone programs. This week, Slate's David Weigel noticed that public opinion about drones has changed significantly since that filibuster. Bob spoke with Weigel about the connection.

Errors - Tusk

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Is the Obama Administration Waging A 'War on Leakers'?

The rate of prosecution of government leakers has reached unprecedented heights under President Obama, twice that of every other president combined. It's been called a 'war on leakers'. But is it? Columbia Law professor David Pozen, author of The Leaky Leviathan: Why the Government Condemns and Condones Unlawful Disclosures of Information, tells Brooke that when you consider the total number of government leakers - less then 1% are punished.

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Remembering Anthony Lewis

Anthony Lewis passed away this week at 85 after a long and storied career covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times. In a segment originally aired in 2008, Brooke spoke with Lewis about his book Freedom for the Thought We Hate, an examination of the First Amendment. He explained that the amendment that governs free speech and the press might not be as familiar as we think.

 

Oddisee - Frostbite

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A Conversation with Basketball Great Walt "Clyde" Frazier

With his cool rhymes and even cooler clothes, Basketball Hall of Famer Walt "Clyde" Frazier sat down with Brooke Gladstone for a live event to discuss basketball, broadcasting and the art of being cool.

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